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Fertility Patterns in the Roma Population of Spain

Listed author(s):
  • Aisa, Rosa
  • Andaluz, Joaquín
  • Gemma, Larramona

The aim of this paper is to determine the significant variables in the fertility patterns of the Roma population in Spain. Family and home production are two of the idiosyncratic features of this minority group, and our theoretical and empirical analyses take account of both, as well as other variables that appear in the existing literature. Our main insights are that a greater bargaining power of parents, with respect to their adult children, and a greater involvement of adult children in the production of the family good, are major contributory factors in increasing the number of children.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/52972/1/MPRA_paper_52972.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 52972.

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Date of creation: 15 Jan 2014
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:52972
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  14. Suen, Wing & Chan, William & Zhang, Junsen, 2003. "Marital transfer and intra-household allocation: a Nash-bargaining analysis," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 133-146, September.
  15. David de la Croix & Matthias Doepke, 2003. "Inequality and Growth: Why Differential Fertility Matters," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1091-1113, September.
  16. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
  17. Chen, Zhiqi & Woolley, Frances, 2001. "A Cournot-Nash Model of Family Decision Making," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(474), pages 722-748, October.
  18. Gary S. Becker & Robert J. Barro, 1988. "A Reformulation of the Economic Theory of Fertility," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 103(1), pages 1-25.
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  20. McElroy, Marjorie B & Horney, Mary Jean, 1981. "Nash-Bargained Household Decisions: Toward a Generalization of the Theory of Demand," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 22(2), pages 333-349, June.
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