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Diana Aurora Warren

Personal Details

First Name:Diana
Middle Name:Aurora
Last Name:Warren
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pwa292
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research (MIAESR)
Faculty of Business and Economics
University of Melbourne

Melbourne, Australia
http://www.melbourneinstitute.com/

+61 3 8344 2100
+61 3 8344 2111
The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010
RePEc:edi:mimelau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Diana Warren & John P. Haisken-DeNew, 2013. "Early Bird Catches the Worm: The Causal Impact of Pre-school Participation and Teacher Qualifications on Year 3 National NAPLAN Cognitive Tests," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n34, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Diana Warren, 2013. "Retirement Decisions of Couples: The Impact of Spousal Characteristics and Preferences on the Timing of Retirement," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n41, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  3. Robert Drago & Katina Sawyer & Karina M Shreffler & Diana Warren & Mark Wooden, 2009. "Did Australia's Baby Bonus Increase the Fertility Rate?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2009n01, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  4. Diana Warren, 2008. "Australia's Retirement Income System:Historical Development and Effects of Recent Reforms," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2008n23, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  5. Diana Warren, 2008. "Retirement Expectations and Labour Force Transitions: The Experience of the Baby Boomer Generation," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2008n24, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  6. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren & Robert Drago, 2007. "Working Time Mismatch and Subjective Well-Being," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2007n29, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  7. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren, 2007. "Paid Annual Leave and Working Hours," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2007n20, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  8. Diana Warren & Umut Oguzoglu, 2007. "Retirement in Australia: A Closer Look at the Financial Incentives," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2007n24, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  9. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren, 2003. "The Characteristics of Casual and Fixed-Term Employment: Evidence from the HILDA Survey," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2003n15, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

Articles

  1. Warren, Diana A., 2015. "Retirement decisions of couples in Australia: The impact of spousal characteristics and preferences," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 6(C), pages 149-162.
  2. John Freebairn & Diana Warren, 2010. "Policy Forum: Saving for Retirement: Retirement Incomes and Employment Decisions of the Mature Aged," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 43(3), pages 312-320, September.
  3. Diana Warren & Umut Oguzoglu, 2010. "Retirement in Australia: A Closer Look at the Financial Incentives," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 43(4), pages 357-375, December.
  4. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren & Robert Drago, 2009. "Working Time Mismatch and Subjective Well‐being," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(1), pages 147-179, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Diana Warren & John P. Haisken-DeNew, 2013. "Early Bird Catches the Worm: The Causal Impact of Pre-school Participation and Teacher Qualifications on Year 3 National NAPLAN Cognitive Tests," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n34, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

    Cited by:

    1. Kamhöfer, Daniel, 2014. "The Effect of Early Childhood Language Training Programs on the Contemporary Formation of Grammar Skills," VfS Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100374, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Nikhil Jha, 2015. "Late Start with Extra Schooling: The Effect of Increase in School Entry Age and Preschool Provision," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 91(S1), pages 54-77, June.
    3. Janeli Kotzé, 2015. "The readiness of the South African education system for a pre-Grade R year," Working Papers 15/2015, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    4. Nikhil Jha, 2014. "Late Start with Extra Schooling: The Effect of School Entry-Age Increase and the Introduction of Preparatory Year," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2014n10, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

  2. Robert Drago & Katina Sawyer & Karina M Shreffler & Diana Warren & Mark Wooden, 2009. "Did Australia's Baby Bonus Increase the Fertility Rate?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2009n01, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

    Cited by:

    1. Gordey Yastrebov, 2016. "Intergenerational Social Mobility in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 69/SOC/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    2. Beatrice Brunner & Andreas Kuhn, 2011. "Financial Incentives, the Timing of Births, Birth Complications, and Newborns’ Health: Evidence from the Abolition of Austria’s Baby Bonus," NRN working papers 2011-16, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    3. Magdalena Smyk & Joanna Tyrowicz & Lucas van der Velde, 2021. "A Cautionary Note on the Reliability of the Online Survey Data: The Case of Wage Indicator," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 50(1), pages 429-464, February.
    4. Fan Elliott & Maitra Pushkar, 2013. "Women Rule: Preferences and Fertility in Australian Households," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 1-30, April.
    5. Mikko Myrskylä & Rachel Margolis, 2013. "Parental benefits improve parental well-being: evidence from a 2007 policy change in Germany," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2013-010, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    6. Krzysztof Makarski & Joanna Tyrowicz & Magda Malec, 2019. "Evaluating welfare and economic effects of raised fertility," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201902, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    7. Bing Xu & Maxwell Pak, 2021. "Child-raising cost and fertility from a contest perspective," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 186(1), pages 9-28, January.
    8. Beatrice Brunner & Andreas Kuhn, 2011. "Financial incentives, the timing of births, birth complications, and newborns' health: Evidence from the abolition of Austria's baby bonus," ECON - Working Papers 048, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    9. Svetlana Biryukova & Oxana Sinyavskaya & Irina Nurimanova, 2016. "Estimating effects of 2007 family policy changes on probability of second and subsequent births in Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 68/SOC/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    10. Ross Guest & Nick Parr, 2009. "The effects of family benefits on childbearing decisions: a household optimising approach applied to Australia," Discussion Papers in Economics economics:200907, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.
    11. Mengni Chen & Chris J Lloyd & Paul S F Yip, 2018. "A new method of identifying target groups for pronatalist policy applied to Australia," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 13(2), pages 1-13, February.
    12. Nick Parr, 2011. "The contribution of increases in family benefits to Australia’s early 21st-century fertility increase: An empirical analysis," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(6), pages 215-244.
    13. Isabella Buber-Ennser & Ralina Panova & Jürgen Dorbritz, 2013. "Fertility Intentions Of University Graduates," Demográfia English Edition, Hungarian Demographic Research Institute, vol. 56(5), pages 5-34.
    14. Gaitz, Jason & Schurer, Stefanie, 2017. "Bonus Skills: Examining the Effect of an Unconditional Cash Transfer on Child Human Capital Formation," IZA Discussion Papers 10525, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Beatrice Brunner & Andreas Kuhn, 2014. "Announcement effects of health policy reforms: evidence from the abolition of Austria’s baby bonus," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(4), pages 373-388, May.
    16. Brunner, Beatrice & Kuhn, Andreas, 2011. "Financial Incentives, the Timing of Births, Birth Complications, and Newborns' Health: Evidence from the Abolition of Austria's Baby Bonus," IZA Discussion Papers 6141, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  3. Diana Warren, 2008. "Australia's Retirement Income System:Historical Development and Effects of Recent Reforms," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2008n23, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

    Cited by:

    1. Kadir Atalay & Garry F. Barrett, 2012. "The Impact of Age Pension Eligibility Age on Retirement and Program Dependence: Evidence from an Australian Experiment," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 295, McMaster University.
    2. Panha Heng & Scott J. Niblock & Jennifer L. Harrison, 2015. "Retirement policy: a review of the role, characteristics, and contribution of the Australian superannuation system," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 29(2), pages 1-17, November.
    3. Warren, Diana A., 2015. "Retirement decisions of couples in Australia: The impact of spousal characteristics and preferences," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 6(C), pages 149-162.

  4. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren & Robert Drago, 2007. "Working Time Mismatch and Subjective Well-Being," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2007n29, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

    Cited by:

    1. Malbon Eleanor & Carey Dr. Gemma, 2017. "Implications of work time flexibility for health promoting behaviours," Evidence Base, Australia and New Zealand School of Government, vol. 2017(4), pages 1-17, December.
    2. Jan Kleibrink, 2014. "Sick of Your Job?: Negative Health Effects from Non-optimal Employment," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 718, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. Lonnie Golden & Stuart Glosser, 2013. "Work sharing as a potential policy tool for creating more and better employment: A review of the evidence," Chapters, in: Jon C. Messenger & Naj Ghosheh (ed.), Work Sharing during the Great Recession, chapter 7, pages 203-258, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Elena Shvartsman & Michael Beckmann, 2015. "Stressed by Your Job: What Is the Role of Personnel Policy?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 814, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    5. Christoph Wunder & Guido Heineck, 2012. "Working Time Preferences, Hours Mismatch and Well-Being of Couples: Are There Spillovers?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 471, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    6. Andrew M. Bryce, 2019. "Weekend working in 21st century Britain:Does it matter for well-being?," Working Papers 2019007, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    7. Michael C. Knaus & Steffen Otterbach, 2016. "Work Hour Mismatch and Job Mobility: Adjustment Channels and Resolution Rates," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 825, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    8. Elke Wolf, 2014. "The German Part-Time Wage Gap: Bad News for Men," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 663, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    9. Cem Başlevent, 2014. "The Work-Life Conflict and Well-Being of Turkish Employees," Ekonomi-tek - International Economics Journal, Turkish Economic Association, vol. 3(1), pages 57-76, January.
    10. Qiu, Hanyao & Bures, Regina & Shehan, Constance L., 2012. "The inconsistent mediating effects of psychosocial work characteristics on the education–health relationship," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(8), pages 1539-1546.
    11. Green, Francis, 2011. "Unpacking the misery multiplier: How employability modifies the impacts of unemployment and job insecurity on life satisfaction and mental health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 265-276, March.
    12. Deborah De Moortel & Nico Dragano & Morten Wahrendorf, 2020. "Involuntary Full- and Part-Time Work: Employees’ Mental Health and the Role of Family- and Work-Related Resources," Societies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(4), pages 1-14, October.
    13. Zehra Bilgen SUSANLI, 2017. "Underemployment in the Turkish Labor Market," Sosyoekonomi Journal, Sosyoekonomi Society, issue 25(33).
    14. Zwickl, Klara & Disslbacher, Franziska & Stagl, Sigrid, 2016. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 246-253.
    15. Robert Drago & Mark Wooden & David Black, 2009. "Long Work Hours: Volunteers and Conscripts," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(3), pages 571-600, September.
    16. Hetschko, Clemens & Knabe, Andreas & Schöb, Ronnie, 2021. "Happiness, Work, and Identity," GLO Discussion Paper Series 783, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    17. Christopher L Ambrey & Christopher M Fleming, 2012. "Valuing Australia's protected areas: A life satisfaction approach," Discussion Papers in Economics economics:201203, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.
    18. Robert Breunig & Xiaodong Gong & Gordon Leslie, 2015. "The Dynamics of Satisfaction with Working Hours in Australia: The Usefulness of Panel Data in Evaluating the Case for Policy Intervention," Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(1), pages 130-154, January.
    19. Bell, David N.F. & Otterbach, Steffen & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2011. "Work Hours Constraints and Health," IZA Discussion Papers 6126, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    20. KURODA Sachiko & YAMAMOTO Isamu, 2016. "Why Do People Overwork at the Risk of Impairing Mental Health?," Discussion papers 16037, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    21. Stefanie Gerold & Matthias Nocker, 2015. "Reduction of Working Time in Austria. A Mixed Methods Study Relating a New Work Time Policy to Employee Preferences. WWWforEurope Working Paper No. 97," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 58139, December.
    22. Cheryl Carleton & Mary T. Kelly, 2016. "Alternative Work Arrangements and Job Satisfaction," Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics Working Paper Series 32, Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics.
    23. Bell, David N.F. & Blanchflower, David G., 2019. "The well-being of the overemployed and the underemployed and the rise in depression in the UK," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 180-196.
    24. Steffen Otterbach, 2010. "Mismatches Between Actual and Preferred Work Time: Empirical Evidence of Hours Constraints in 21 Countries," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 143-161, June.
    25. Ambrey, Christopher L. & Fleming, Christopher M., 2011. "Valuing scenic amenity using life satisfaction data," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 106-115.
    26. Sarah Holly & Alwine Mohnen, 2012. "Impact of Working Hours on Work-Life Balance," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 465, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    27. Steffen Otterbach & Mark Wooden & Yin King Fok, 2016. "Working-Time Mismatch and Mental Health," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n11, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    28. Robert Metcalfe & John Feddersen & Mark Wooden, 2012. "Subjective Well-Being: Weather Matters; Climate Doesn't," Economics Series Working Papers 627, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    29. Pham, Tho & Talavera, Oleksandr & Zhang, Mao, 2018. "Self-employment, financial development, and well-being: Evidence from China, Russia, and Ukraine," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 754-769.
    30. Stephan Humpert, 2014. "Working time, satisfaction and work life balance: A European perspective," SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, University of Piraeus, vol. 64(4), pages 3-17, October-D.
    31. Christopher Ambrey & Christopher Fleming, 2014. "Public Greenspace and Life Satisfaction in Urban Australia," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 51(6), pages 1290-1321, May.
    32. Nguyen, Ha Trong & Duncan, Alan S, 2017. "Exchange rate fluctuations and immigrants' labour market outcomes: New evidence from Australian household panel data," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 174-186.
    33. Buddelmeyer, Hielke & McVicar, Duncan & Wooden, Mark, 2013. "Non-Standard 'Contingent' Employment and Job Satisfaction: A Panel Data Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 7590, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    34. Anja Iseke, 2014. "The Part-Time Job Satisfaction Puzzle: Different Types of Job Discrepancies and the Moderating Effect of Family Importance," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 52(3), pages 445-469, September.
    35. Bram De Rock & Guillaume Perilleux, 2021. "Time Use and Life Satisfaction within Couples: A Gender Analysis for Belgium," Working Papers ECARES 2021-01, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    36. Ricardo Pagan, 2017. "Impact of Working Time Mismatch on Job Satisfaction: Evidence for German Workers with Disabilities," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 125-149, February.
    37. T. Kifle & P. Kler & S. Shankar, 2019. "The Underemployment-Job Satisfaction Nexus: A Study of Part-Time Employment in Australia," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 143(1), pages 233-249, May.
    38. Schuster, Monica & Vranken, Liesbet & Maertens, Miet, 2017. "You Can(’t) Always Get the Job You Want: Stated versus Revealed Employment Preferences in the Peruvian Agro-industry," Working Papers 254076, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.
    39. Frei, Irina & Grund, Christian, 2017. "Antecedents of Overtime Work: The Case of Junior Academics," IZA Discussion Papers 11065, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    40. Ambrey, Christopher L. & Fleming, Christopher M., 2011. "Valuing Ecosystem Diversity in South East Queensland: A Life Satisfaction Approach," 2011 Conference, August 25-26, 2011, Nelson, New Zealand 115347, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    41. Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2012. "Work Hours in Chinese Enterprises: Evidence From Matched Employer-Employee Data," Monash Economics Working Papers 10-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    42. Verbruggen, M. & van Emmerik, H. & van Gils, A.E.J. & Meng, C.M. & de Grip, A., 2015. "Does early-career underemployment impact future career success? : a path dependency perspective," Research Memorandum 023, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).
    43. Esteban Calvo & Pablo Gonzalez, 2014. "Calidad del Empleo desde los Enfoques del Bienestar Subjetivo y el Desarrollo Humano," Working Papers 50, Facultad de Economía y Empresa, Universidad Diego Portales.
    44. Argyro Avgoustaki & Almudena Cañibano, 2020. "Motivational Drivers of Extensive Work Effort: Are Long Hours Always Detrimental to Well‐being?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(3), pages 355-398, July.
    45. Adam Okulicz-Kozaryn & Lonnie Golden, 2018. "Happiness is Flextime," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 13(2), pages 355-369, June.
    46. Adrian Chadi & Clemens Hetschko, 2016. "How Job Changes Affect People's Lives - Evidence from Subjective Well-being Data," CESifo Working Paper Series 5929, CESifo.
    47. Cem Baslevent, 2014. "The Work-Life Conflict and Well-Being of Turkish Employees," Working Papers 827, Economic Research Forum, revised May 2014.
    48. Bart Loog & Thomas Dohmen & Maarten Vendrik, 2013. "The Scope for Increasing Total Hours Worked," De Economist, Springer, vol. 161(2), pages 157-174, June.
    49. Angrave, David & Charlwood, Andy & Wooden, Mark, 2014. "Working time and cigarette smoking: Evidence from Australia and the United Kingdom," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 72-79.
    50. Rahma Daly & Marc-Arthur Diaye, 2017. "Do Performance Appraisals Decrease Employees’ Perception of Their Psychosocial Risks?," Documents de recherche 17-04, Centre d'Études des Politiques Économiques (EPEE), Université d'Evry Val d'Essonne.
    51. Cem Başlevent & Hasan Kirmanoğlu, 2014. "The Impact of Deviations from Desired Hours of Work on the Life Satisfaction of Employees," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 118(1), pages 33-43, August.
    52. Begoña Álvarez & Daniel Miles-Touya, 2016. "Time Allocation and Women’s Life Satisfaction: Evidence from Spain," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 129(3), pages 1207-1230, December.
    53. Wunder, Christoph, 2016. "Working hours mismatch and well-being: comparative evidence from Australian and German panel data," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145544, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    54. Klara Zwickl & Franziska Disslbacher & Sigrid Stagl, 2016. "Work-sharing for a Sustainable Economy. WWWforEurope Working Paper No. 111," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 58684, December.
    55. Wanger, Susanne, 2017. "What makes employees satisfied with their working time? : The role of working hours, time-sovereignty and working conditions for working time and job satisfaction," IAB Discussion Paper 201720, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    56. Fang, Tony & Lee, Byron & Timming, Andrew R. & Fan, Di, 2019. "The Effects of Work-Life Benefits on Employment Outcomes in Canada: A Multivariate Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 12322, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    57. Kristoffersen, Ingebjørg, 2018. "Great expectations: Education and subjective wellbeing," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 64-78.
    58. Alameddine, Mohamad & Otterbach, Steffen & Rafii, Bayan & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2018. "Work hour constraints in the German nursing workforce: A quarter of a century in review," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 122(10), pages 1101-1108.
    59. Mousteri, Victoria & Daly, Michael & Delaney, Liam, 2020. "Underemployment and psychological distress: Propensity score and fixed effects estimates from two large UK samples," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 244(C).
    60. Mark L. Bryan & Alita Nandi, 2018. "Working Hours, Work Identity and Subjective Wellbeing," Working Papers 2018002, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    61. Surhan Cam, 2014. "The Underemployed: Evidence From the UK Labour Force Survey for a Conditionally Gendered Top-down Model," Journal of Social Science Studies, Macrothink Institute, vol. 1(2), pages 47-65, July.
    62. Egidio Riva & Mario Lucchini & Marcello Russo, 2019. "Societal Gender Inequality as Moderator of the Relationship Between Work–Life Fit and Subjective Well-Being: A Multilevel Analysis Across European Countries," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 143(2), pages 657-691, June.
    63. T. Kifle & P. Kler & S. Shankar, 2017. "Underemployment and its impact on job satisfaction: An Australian study on part-time employment," Discussion Papers in Economics economics:201712, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.
    64. Miranti, Riyana & Li, Jinjing, 2020. "Working hours mismatch, job strain and mental health among mature age workers in Australia," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 15(C).
    65. A.M. Dockery & Sherry Bawa, 2014. "Is Working from Home Good Work or Bad Work? Evidence from Australian Employees," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 17(2), pages 163-190.
    66. Kamerāde, Daiga & Wang, Senhu & Burchell, Brendan & Balderson, Sarah Ursula & Coutts, Adam, 2019. "A shorter working week for everyone: How much paid work is needed for mental health and well-being?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 241(C).
    67. Damir Esenaliev & Neil T. N. Ferguson, 2019. "The Impact of Job Quality on Wellbeing: Evidence from Kyrgyzstan," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 144(1), pages 337-378, July.
    68. Ekaterina Uglanova & Jan Dettmers, 2018. "Sustained Effects of Flexible Working Time Arrangements on Subjective Well-Being," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 19(6), pages 1727-1748, August.
    69. McNamee, Paul & Mendolia, Silvia, 2014. "The effect of chronic pain on life satisfaction: Evidence from Australian data," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 65-73.
    70. Stefanie Schurer & Jongsay Yong, 2010. "Personality, Well-being and Heterogeneous Valuations of Income and Work," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2010n14, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    71. Constant, Amelie F. & Otterbach, Steffen, 2011. "Work Hours Constraints: Impacts and Policy Implications," IZA Policy Papers 35, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    72. Jan-Emmanuel De Neve & Christian Krekel & George Ward, 2019. "Employee wellbeing, productivity and firm performance," CEP Discussion Papers dp1605, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    73. Arndt Werner & Johanna Gast & Sascha Kraus, 2014. "The effect of working time preferences and fair wage perceptions on entrepreneurial intentions among employees," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 137-160, June.
    74. MORIKAWA Masayuki, 2018. "Uncertainty over Working Schedules and Compensating Wage Differentials: From the viewpoint of labor management," Discussion papers 18015, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    75. Cem Başlevent & Hasan Kirmanoğlu, 2017. "Gender Inequality in Europe and the Life Satisfaction of Working and Non-working Women," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 107-124, February.
    76. Mark Wooden & Ning Li, 2014. "Panel Conditioning and Subjective Well-being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 117(1), pages 235-255, May.

  5. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren, 2007. "Paid Annual Leave and Working Hours," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2007n20, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

    Cited by:

    1. Varvarigos, Dimitrios, 2011. "Non-monotonic welfare dynamics in a growing economy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 303-312, June.
    2. Laszlo Goerke & Sabrina Jeworrek, 2016. "Paid Vacation Use - The Role of Works Councils," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201601, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).

  6. Diana Warren & Umut Oguzoglu, 2007. "Retirement in Australia: A Closer Look at the Financial Incentives," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2007n24, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

    Cited by:

    1. Barbara Broadway & John P. Haisken-DeNew, 2014. "The Importance of Economic Expectations for Retirement Entry," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2014n28, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    2. Jennifer Poehl & Bruce Cunningham, 2011. "Labour Market Engagement of Mature-Age Workers," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 14(3), pages 237-264.
    3. Michael Littlewood, 2010. "Pre-funding a government's future financial obligations - the New Zealand Superannuation case study," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(1), pages 91-111.
    4. Diana Warren, 2013. "Retirement Decisions of Couples: The Impact of Spousal Characteristics and Preferences on the Timing of Retirement," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n41, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

  7. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren, 2003. "The Characteristics of Casual and Fixed-Term Employment: Evidence from the HILDA Survey," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2003n15, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter Siminski, 2013. "Are low-skill public sector workers really overpaid? A quasi-differenced panel data analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(14), pages 1915-1929, May.
    2. Matthew Gray & Lixia Qu, 2004. "Long work hours and the wellbeing of fathers and their families," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 7(2), pages 255-273, June.
    3. Siminski, Peter, 2008. "What Would the Average Public Sector Employee be Paid in the Private Sector?," Economics Working Papers wp08-05, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    4. Productivity Commission, 2006. "The Role of Non-Traditional Work in the Australian Labour Market," Research Papers 0601, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia.
    5. Alison Booth & Margi Wood, 2006. "Back-to-front Down-under? Estimating the Part-time/Full-time Wage Differential over the Period 2001-2003," CEPR Discussion Papers 525, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    6. Booth, Alison L. & Wood, Margi, 2006. "Back-to-front Down-under? Part-time/Full-time Wage Differentials in Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 2268, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

Articles

  1. Warren, Diana A., 2015. "Retirement decisions of couples in Australia: The impact of spousal characteristics and preferences," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 6(C), pages 149-162.

    Cited by:

    1. von Gaessler, Anne Edle & Ziesemer, Thomas, 2016. "Optimal education in times of ageing: The dependency ratio in the Uzawa–Lucas growth model," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 7(C), pages 125-142.
    2. Queiroz, Bernardo L. & Souza, Laeticia R., 2017. "Retirement incentives and couple’s retirement decisions in Brazil," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 9(C), pages 1-13.
    3. Pérez, Carlos & Martín-Román, Ángel & Moral, Alfonso, 2020. "Two decades of the complementary leisure effect in Spain," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 15(C).

  2. Diana Warren & Umut Oguzoglu, 2010. "Retirement in Australia: A Closer Look at the Financial Incentives," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 43(4), pages 357-375, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren & Robert Drago, 2009. "Working Time Mismatch and Subjective Well‐being," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(1), pages 147-179, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 8 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (6) 2003-05-29 2008-01-05 2008-01-05 2008-12-01 2009-07-11 2013-12-29. Author is listed
  2. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (3) 2008-01-05 2008-12-01 2013-12-29
  3. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2013-12-29
  4. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2013-11-02
  5. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (1) 2008-01-05
  6. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (1) 2013-11-02
  7. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2013-11-02

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