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The Scope for Increasing Total Hours Worked

  • Bart Loog


  • Thomas Dohmen
  • Maarten Vendrik

Dutch women who work long hours mostly prefer to work shorter hours whereas women who work short hours mostly prefer to work longer hours. This paper shows that the point where preferred and actual working hours are on average equal depends on individual characteristics. This heterogeneity is of interest to policy makers who are aiming to increase the total number of hours worked by women. The tool this paper develops is informative in two ways. First, it shows in what hours range we find individuals of a certain type who want to work longer or shorter hours. Second, it calculates the relative sizes of these groups to examine the scope for policy. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

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Article provided by Springer in its journal De Economist.

Volume (Year): 161 (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 157-174

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Handle: RePEc:kap:decono:v:161:y:2013:i:2:p:157-174
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  1. Rob Euwals & Marike Knoef & Daniel van Vuuren, 2007. "The trend in female labour force participation; what can be expected for the future?," CPB Discussion Paper 93, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  2. Euwals, Rob & Hogerbrugge, Maurice, 2006. "Explaining the Growth of Part-Time Employment: Factors of Supply and Demand," CEPR Discussion Papers 5595, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Shulamit Kahn & Kevin Lang, 1988. "The Effects of Hours Constraints on Labor Supply Estimates," NBER Working Papers 2647, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Lazear, Edward P, 1979. "Why Is There Mandatory Retirement?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(6), pages 1261-84, December.
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  6. Euwals, Rob, 2001. "Female Labour Supply, Flexibility of Working Hours, and Job Mobility," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(471), pages C120-34, May.
  7. Alan Manning & Barbara Petrongolo, 2008. "The Part-Time Pay Penalty for Women in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages F28-F51, 02.
  8. Stewart, Mark B & Swaffield, Joanna K, 1997. "Constraints on the Desired Hours of Work of British Men," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(441), pages 520-35, March.
  9. Hirsch, Barry, 2004. "Why Do Part-Time Workers Earn Less? The Role of Worker and Job Skills," IZA Discussion Papers 1261, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. K√ľnn-Nelen, Annemarie & de Grip, Andries & Fouarge, Didier, 2011. "Is Part-Time Employment Beneficial for Firm Productivity?," IZA Discussion Papers 5423, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren & Robert Drago, 2007. "Working Time Mismatch and Subjective Well-Being," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2007n29, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  12. John F. Ermisch & Robert E. Wright, 1993. "Wage Offers and Full-Time and Part-Time Employment by British Women," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(1), pages 111-133.
  13. Alison Booth & Jan Ours, 2013. "Part-time jobs: what women want?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 263-283, January.
  14. Lazear, Edward P, 1981. "Agency, Earnings Profiles, Productivity, and Hours Restrictions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(4), pages 606-20, September.
  15. Hashimoto, Masanori, 1981. "Firm-Specific Human Capital as a Shared Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 475-82, June.
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