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Explaining the Growth of Part-time Employment: Factors of Supply and Demand


  • Rob Euwals
  • Maurice Hogerbrugge


Using the Dutch Labour Force Survey 1991-2001, the authors investigate the incidence of part-time employment in the country with the highest part-time employment rate of the OECD countries. Women fulfil most part-time jobs, but a considerable fraction of men works part-time as well. Evidence from descriptive statistics and a macroeconometric model at the sectoral level of industry suggests that the growth of part-time employment in the 1990s relates strongly to the growth in female labour force participation. Factors of labour demand, such as the shift from manufacturing to services and the increase in the demand for flexible labour, turn out to play a significant role as well. Copyright 2006 The Authors; Journal compilation 2006 CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd..

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  • Rob Euwals & Maurice Hogerbrugge, 2006. "Explaining the Growth of Part-time Employment: Factors of Supply and Demand," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 20(3), pages 533-557, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:20:y:2006:i:3:p:533-557

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Klinger, Sabine & Wolf, Katja, 2008. "What explains changes in full-time and part-time employment in Western Germany? : a new method on an old question," IAB Discussion Paper 200807, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    2. Picchio, Matteo & van Ours, Jan C., 2016. "Gender and the effect of working hours on firm-sponsored training," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 192-211.
    3. Elke Wolf, 2014. "The German Part-Time Wage Gap: Bad News for Men," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 663, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    4. Valletta, Robert G. & Bengali, Leila & van der List, Catherine, 2015. "Cyclical and market determinants of involuntary part-time employment," Working Paper Series 2015-19, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    5. Bart Loog & Thomas Dohmen & Maarten Vendrik, 2013. "The Scope for Increasing Total Hours Worked," De Economist, Springer, vol. 161(2), pages 157-174, June.
    6. Ramos, Raul & Sanromá, Esteban & Simón, Hipólito, 2015. "An Analysis of Wage Differentials between Full- and Part-Time Workers in Spain," IZA Discussion Papers 9257, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Wolf, Elke, 2013. "The German part-time wage gap: bad news for men," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79969, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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