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Gender and the Effect of Working Hours on Firm-Sponsored Training

Author

Listed:
  • Matteo PICCHIO

    () (Universit… Politecnica delle Marche, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali)

  • Jan C. VAN OURS

    () (Department of Economics, Tilburg University, The Netherlands)

Abstract

Using employees' longitudinal data, we study the effect of working hours on the propensity of firms to sponsor training of their employees. We show that, whereas male part-time workers are less likely to receive training than male full-timers, part-time working women are as likely to receive training as full-time working women. Although we cannot rule out gender-working time specific monopsony power, we speculate that the gender-specific effect of working hours on training has to do with gender-specific stereotyping. In the Netherlands, for women it is common to work part-time. More than half of the prime age female employees work part-time. Therefore, because of social norms, men working part-time could send a different signal to their employer than women working part-time. This might generate a different propensity of firms to sponsor training of male part-timers than female part-timers.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Matteo PICCHIO & Jan C. VAN OURS, 2015. "Gender and the Effect of Working Hours on Firm-Sponsored Training," Working Papers 413, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
  • Handle: RePEc:anc:wpaper:413
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Part-time employment; firm-sponsored training; gender; human capital; working hours;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions
    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training

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