IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

What makes employees satisfied with their working time? : The role of working hours, time-sovereignty and working conditions for working time and job satisfaction

Listed author(s):
  • Wanger, Susanne

    ()

    (Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany])

Registered author(s):

    "Working time arrangements are key elements of working conditions and determine the possibilities for employees to balance work with their other life spheres. Therefore, this paper examines the level of working time satisfaction of employees and identifies the factors that may facilitate or impede satisfaction with working time using crosssectional data from the German BIBB/BAuA-Employment Survey. The analytical basis is a generalized ordered logistic regression model. The main results indicate that individual time-sovereignty is positively linked with a high level of working time satisfaction. Worker-friendly working time arrangements, which lead to less stress, insecurity and mental pressure, increase satisfaction levels, whereas atypical working time arrangements, such as unpaid overtime and working shifts, weekends and under high intensity, reduce satisfaction levels." (Author's abstract, IAB-Doku) ((en))

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://doku.iab.de/discussionpapers/2017/dp2017.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany] in its series IAB Discussion Paper with number 201720.

    as
    in new window

    Length: 40 pages
    Date of creation: 19 Jun 2017
    Handle: RePEc:iab:iabdpa:201720
    Contact details of provider: Postal:
    Regensburger Str. 104, D-90327 Nürnberg

    Phone: 0911/179-0
    Fax: 0911/179-3258
    Web page: http://www.iab.de/
    Email:


    More information through EDIRC

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as
    in new window


    1. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren & Robert Drago, 2009. "Working Time Mismatch and Subjective Well-being," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(1), pages 147-179, March.
    2. HAURET Laetitia & WILLIAMS Donald R., 2013. "Cross-national analysis of gender differences in job satisfaction," LISER Working Paper Series 2013-27, LISER.
    3. Peter H. van der Meer & Rudi Wielers, 2013. "What makes workers happy?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(3), pages 357-368, January.
    4. Justina A. V. Fischer & Alfonso Sousa-Poza, 2009. "Does job satisfaction improve the health of workers? New evidence using panel data and objective measures of health," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 71-89.
    5. Michael C. Knaus & Steffen Otterbach, 2016. "Work Hour Mismatch and Job Mobility: Adjustment Channels and Resolution Rates," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 825, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    6. AlisonL. Booth & JanC. vanOurs, 2008. "Job Satisfaction and Family Happiness: The Part-Time Work Puzzle," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages 77-99, 02.
    7. Werner Eichhorst, 2015. "The Unexpected Appearance of a New German Model," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 53(1), pages 49-69, March.
    8. Alison Booth & Jan Ours, 2013. "Part-time jobs: what women want?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 263-283, January.
    9. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J., 1996. "Satisfaction and comparison income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 359-381, September.
    10. Wunder, Christoph & Heineck, Guido, 2013. "Working time preferences, hours mismatch and well-being of couples: Are there spillovers?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 244-252.
    11. Lonnie Golden, 2015. "FLSA Working Hours Reform: Worker Well-Being Effects in an Economic Framework," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(4), pages 717-749, October.
    12. Drago, Robert & Wooden, Mark & Black, David, 2006. "Who Wants Flexibility? Changing Work Hours Preferences and Life Events," IZA Discussion Papers 2404, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Richard Williams, 2010. "Fitting heterogeneous choice models with oglm," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 10(4), pages 540-567, December.
    14. Dominik Hanglberger, 2010. "Arbeitszufriedenheit und flexible Arbeitszeiten – Empirische Analyse mit Daten des Sozio-oekonomischen Panels," FFB-Discussionpaper 80, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
    15. Andrew J. Oswald & Eugenio Proto & Daniel Sgroi, 2015. "Happiness and Productivity," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(4), pages 789-822.
    16. Getinet A. Haile, 2015. "Workplace Job Satisfaction in Britain: Evidence from Linked Employer–Employee Data," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(3), pages 225-242, September.
    17. Richard Williams, 2009. "Using Heterogeneous Choice Models to Compare Logit and Probit Coefficients Across Groups," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 37(4), pages 531-559, May.
    18. Merz, Joachim, 2002. "Time and Economic Well-Being--A Panel Analysis of Desired versus Actual Working Hours," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(3), pages 317-346, September.
    19. Liana Christin Landivar, 2015. "The gender gap in employment hours: do work-hour regulations matter?," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 29(4), pages 550-570, August.
    20. J. Scott Long & Jeremy Freese, 2006. "Regression Models for Categorical Dependent Variables using Stata, 2nd Edition," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, edition 2, number long2, January.
    21. Richard Williams, 2006. "Generalized ordered logit/partial proportional odds models for ordinal dependent variables," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 6(1), pages 58-82, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iab:iabdpa:201720. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (IAB, Geschäftsbereich Dokumentation und Bibliothek)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.