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The Role of Non-Traditional Work in the Australian Labour Market

  • Productivity Commission

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    The Productivity commission research paper, ‘The Role of Non-Traditional Work in the Australian Labour Market’ was released on 25 May 2006. There is continuing debate in Australia about the effects of labour market changes on the wellbeing of workers and their families. One such change has been the growth of various forms of employment collectively referred to as ‘non-traditional’ or ‘non-standard’. The Commission has conducted research into each of these forms of employment. This Paper builds on and extends that earlier work. In particular, it uses the most recent data from the important Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey to provide a more complete perspective over time. The Commission finds that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the growth of non-traditional employment in recent years has been in step with that of the workforce in general. Drawing on the HILDA survey, this study also demonstrates the diversity of circumstances of those in such jobs and the dangers of making generalisations about their job satisfaction or wellbeing.

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    File URL: http://www.pc.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0016/8431/nontraditionalwork.pdf
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    File URL: http://www.pc.gov.au/research/commissionresearch/nontraditionalwork
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    Paper provided by Productivity Commission, Government of Australia in its series Research Papers with number 0601.

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    Length: 209 pages.
    Date of creation: May 2006
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ris:prodrp:0601
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    1. Amelie Constant & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2004. "Self-Employment Dynamics across the Business Cycle: Migrants versus Natives," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 455, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Elizabeth Webster & Lei Lei Song, 2001. "How Segmented Are Skilled and Unskilled Labour Markets: The Case of Beveridge Curves," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2001n14, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    3. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren, 2003. "The Characteristics of Casual and Fixed-Term Employment: Evidence from the HILDA Survey," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2003n15, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    4. Gaston, Noel & Timcke, David, 1999. "Do Casual Workers Find Permanent Full-Time Employment? Evidence from the Australian Youth Survey," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 75(231), pages 333-47, December.
    5. Rubery, Jill, 1978. "Structured Labour Markets, Worker Organisation and Low Pay," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 2(1), pages 17-36, March.
    6. Simpson, Michael & Dawkins, Peter & Madden, Gary, 1997. "Casual Employment in Australia: Incidence and Determinants," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(69), pages 194-204, December.
    7. Roger Wilkins, 2004. "The Effects of Disability on Labour Force Status in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 37(4), pages 359-382, December.
    8. Jenny Chalmers & Guyonne Kalb, 2001. "Moving from Unemployment to Permanent Employment: Could a Casual Job Accelerate the Transition?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 34(4), pages 415-436.
    9. Oslington, Paul & Freyens, Ben, 2005. "Dismissal Costs and their Impact on Employment: Evidence from Australian Small and Medium Enterprises," MPRA Paper 961, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Harding, Don, 2002. "The effect of unfair dismissal laws on small and medium sized businesses," MPRA Paper 43, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Michael Förster & Mark Pearson, 2002. "Income Distribution and Poverty in the OECD Area: Trends and Driving Forces," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2002(1), pages 7-38.
    12. de Vos, Klaas & Zaidi, M Asghar, 1997. "Equivalence Scale Sensitivity of Poverty Statistics for the Member States of the European Community," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 43(3), pages 319-33, September.
    13. Gordon B. Dahl & Lance Lochner, 2005. "The Impact of Family Income on Child Achievement," NBER Working Papers 11279, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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