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Changes in the taxation of private pensions: Macroeconomic and welfare effects

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  • Creedy, John
  • Guest, Ross

Abstract

This paper provides an applied general equilibrium analysis of several alternative taxation regimes applying to private pensions. The analysis focuses on the implications of this and other pension tax regimes for intergenerational equity, national living standards, labour supply, saving and social welfare. The method of analysis is simulation of an open economy overlapping generations CGE model. The model is calibrated to Australia and is used to examine the decision, announced by the Australian Government in its 2006 Budget, to exempt from tax all superannuation (the Australian term for superannuation) benefits received by recipients over 60 years of age.

Suggested Citation

  • Creedy, John & Guest, Ross, 2008. "Changes in the taxation of private pensions: Macroeconomic and welfare effects," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 693-712.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:30:y:2008:i:5:p:693-712
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kulish Mariano & Kent Christopher & Smith Kathryn, 2010. "Aging, Retirement, and Savings: A General Equilibrium Analysis," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-32, July.
    2. Kingston, Geoffrey & Piggott, John, 1993. "A Ricardian Equivalence Theorem on the taxation of pension funds," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 399-403.
    3. Creedy, John & Guest, Ross, 2008. "Population ageing and intertemporal consumption: Representative agent versus social planner," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 485-498, May.
    4. Productivity Commission, 2005. "Economic Implications of an Ageing Australia," Labor and Demography 0506001, EconWPA.
    5. Freebairn, John, 1998. "Compulsory Superannuation and Labour Market Responses," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(1), pages 58-70, March.
    6. Wendner, Ronald, 2001. "An applied dynamic general equilibrium model of environmental tax reforms and pension policy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 25-50, January.
    7. John Creedy & Ross Guest, 2008. "The Labour Supply And Savings Effects Of Superannuation Tax Changes ," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 1-14, March.
    8. Atkinson, M E & Creedy, John & Knox, D M, 1996. "Alternative Retirement Income Strategies: A Cohort Analysis of Lifetime Redistribution," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 72(217), pages 97-106, June.
    9. Cerda, Rodrigo A., 2008. "The Chilean pension reform: A model to follow?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 541-558.
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    Cited by:

    1. George Kudrna & Alan D. Woodland, 2013. "Macroeconomic and Welfare Effects of the 2010 Changes to Mandatory Superannuation," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89(287), pages 445-468, December.
    2. Ross Guest, 2010. "Policy Options to Increase Retirement Saving in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 43(3), pages 293-301.
    3. George Kudrna & Alan Woodland, 2012. "Progressive Tax Changes to Private Pensions in a Life-Cycle Framework," Working Papers 201209, ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR), Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales.
    4. Tahar Abdessalem & Houyem Chekki Cherni, 2011. "Macroeconomic Effects of Pension Reforms in the Context of Ageing Populations: Overlapping Generations Model Simulations for Tunisia," Working Papers 603, Economic Research Forum, revised 07 Jan 2011.
    5. Huw Brokensha & Andrew Taylor & Tony Barnes, 2017. "Changing Australia’s Age Pension Qualification Age: Modelling Differential Effects by Race," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 36(2), pages 203-229, April.
    6. Kudrna, George & Woodland, Alan, 2011. "An inter-temporal general equilibrium analysis of the Australian age pension means test," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 61-79, March.
    7. George Kudrna & Alan D. Woodland, 2015. "Progressive Tax Changes to Superannuation in a Lifecycle Framework," CESifo Working Paper Series 5645, CESifo Group Munich.

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