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Work sharing as a potential policy tool for creating more and better employment: A review of the evidence

In: Work Sharing during the Great Recession

Author

Listed:
  • Lonnie Golden
  • Stuart Glosser

Abstract

‘Work sharing’ is a labour market instrument devised to distribute a reduced volume of work to the same (or similar) number of workers over a diminished period of working time in order to avoid redundancies. This fascinating and timely study presents the concept and history of work sharing and explores the complexities and trade-offs involved in its use as both a strategy for preserving jobs and a policy for increasing employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Lonnie Golden & Stuart Glosser, 2013. "Work sharing as a potential policy tool for creating more and better employment: A review of the evidence," Chapters,in: Work Sharing during the Great Recession, chapter 7, pages 203-258 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:15272_7
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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