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Are Shorter Work Hours Good for the Environment? A Comparison of U.S. and European Energy Consumption

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  • David Rosnick
  • Mark Weisbrot

Abstract

European employees work fewer hours per year -- and use less energy per person -- than their American counterparts. This report compares the European and U.S. models of labor productivity and energy consumption. It finds that if all countries worked as many hours per week as U.S. workers do, the world would consume 15 to 30 percent more energy by 2050 than it would by following Europe's model.

Suggested Citation

  • David Rosnick & Mark Weisbrot, 2006. "Are Shorter Work Hours Good for the Environment? A Comparison of U.S. and European Energy Consumption," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2006-32, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  • Handle: RePEc:epo:papers:2006-32
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    File URL: http://www.cepr.net/documents/publications/energy_2006_12.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Lonnie Golden & Stuart Glosser, 2013. "Work sharing as a potential policy tool for creating more and better employment: A review of the evidence," Chapters,in: Work Sharing during the Great Recession, chapter 7, pages 203-258 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Kyle Knight & Eugene A. Rosa & Juliet B. Schor, 2013. "Reducing growth to achieve environmental sustainability: the role of work hours," Chapters,in: Capitalism on Trial, chapter 12 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Stefanie Gerold & Matthias Nocker, 2015. "Reduction of Working Time in Austria. A Mixed Methods Study Relating a New Work Time Policy to Employee Preferences," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 97, WWWforEurope.
    4. Karsten Hansen, 2015. "Exploring Compatibility Between “Subjective Well-Being” and “Sustainable Living” in Scandinavia," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 122(1), pages 175-187, May.
    5. Mario Cogoy, 2010. "Consumption, time and the environment," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 459-477, December.
    6. Nancy Folbre, 2009. "Time Use and Living Standards," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 93(1), pages 77-83, August.

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