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Friday May Never Be the Same Again: Some Results on Work-Sharing from Union-Firm Bargaining Models

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  • Andrews, M J
  • Simmons, R

Abstract

This paper analyses work-sharing in the union-firm bargaining context. In keeping with mechanisms observed in actual negotiations, we assume that the firm sets employment and we consider bargaining regimes with and without overtime. In models without overtime, work-sharing is consistent with union-firm bargaining provided that income-sharing occurs when the wage rises. In models with overtime, a Pareto-improving cut in the workweek requires wage concession, which is necessary, but not sufficient, for work-sharing. Our models are consistent with a number of well-established stylised facts. In particular, we explain why estimates of the actual hours-standard hours elasticity are always close to unity. Copyright 2001 by Scottish Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrews, M J & Simmons, R, 2001. "Friday May Never Be the Same Again: Some Results on Work-Sharing from Union-Firm Bargaining Models," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 48(5), pages 488-516, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:48:y:2001:i:5:p:488-516
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Garofalo & R. Plasman & Concetto Paolo Vinci, 2000. "Reducing Working Time In An Efficiency Wage Economy With A Dual Labour Market," Working Papers 7_2000, D.E.S. (Department of Economic Studies), University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
    2. Lonnie Golden & Stuart Glosser, 2013. "Work sharing as a potential policy tool for creating more and better employment: A review of the evidence," Chapters,in: Work Sharing during the Great Recession, chapter 7, pages 203-258 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Goerke, Laszlo & Hillesheim, Inga, 2013. "Relative consumption, working time, and trade unions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 170-179.
    4. M. J. Andrews & T. Schank & R. Simmons, 2005. "Does Worksharing Work? Some Empirical Evidence From The Iab-Establishment Panel," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 52(2), pages 141-176, May.
    5. Laszlo Goerke, 2017. "Sick pay reforms and health status in a unionised labour market," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 64(2), pages 115-142, May.
    6. Antonio Garofalo & Concetto Paolo Vinci, 2000. "Employment, capital operating time and efficiency wages hypothesis: is there any room for worksharing," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 168, pages 397-442.
    7. Simmons, R. & Schank, Thorsten & Andrews, Martyn J., 2004. "Does Worksharing Work? Some Empirical Evidence from the IAB Panel," Discussion Papers 25, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Chair of Labour and Regional Economics.
    8. Laszlo Goerke, 2016. "Sick Pay Reforms and Health Status in a Unionised Labour Market," IAAEG Discussion Papers until 2011 201604, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    9. Martyn Andrews & Hans-Dieter Gerner & Thorsten Schank & Richard Upward, 2015. "More hours, more jobs? The employment effects of longer working hours," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(2), pages 245-268.

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