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How working time reduction affects jobs and wages

Author

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  • Raposo, Pedro S.
  • van Ours, Jan C.

Abstract

In 1996, by law the maximum standard workweek in Portugal was reduced from 44Â h to 40Â h. We find that for workers involved this change reduced the job separation rate and increased hourly wages, keeping monthly earnings approximately constant. The working hours reduction also affected workers working less than 40Â h per week; they were more likely to lose their job.

Suggested Citation

  • Raposo, Pedro S. & van Ours, Jan C., 2010. "How working time reduction affects jobs and wages," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 106(1), pages 61-63, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:106:y:2010:i:1:p:61-63
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jennifer Hunt, 1999. "Has Work-Sharing Worked in Germany?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 117-148.
    2. Matthieu Chemin & Etienne Wasmer, 2009. "Using Alsace-Moselle Local Laws to Build a Difference-in-Differences Estimation Strategy of the Employment Effects of the 35-Hour Workweek Regulation in France," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(4), pages 487-524, October.
    3. Mikal Skuterud, 2007. "Identifying the Potential of Work-Sharing as a Job-Creation Strategy," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 265-287.
    4. M. J. Andrews & T. Schank & R. Simmons, 2005. "Does Worksharing Work? Some Empirical Evidence From The Iab-Establishment Panel," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 52(2), pages 141-176, May.
    5. Cardoso, Ana Rute, 2006. "Wage mobility: do institutions make a difference?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 387-404, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lonnie Golden & Stuart Glosser, 2013. "Work sharing as a potential policy tool for creating more and better employment: A review of the evidence," Chapters,in: Work Sharing during the Great Recession, chapter 7, pages 203-258 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Pedro Raposo & Jan Ours, 2010. "How a Reduction of Standard Working Hours Affects Employment Dynamics," De Economist, Springer, vol. 158(2), pages 193-207, June.
    3. Sánchez, Rafael, 2013. "Do reductions of standard hours affect employment transitions?: Evidence from Chile," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 24-37.
    4. Arvind Ashta, 2017. "Work-sharing from Different Angles: A literature review," Working Papers CEB 17-033, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    5. Stefan Marth, 2015. "How strong is the correlation between unemployment and growth really? The persistence of Okun's Law and how to weaken it," WWWforEurope Policy Paper series 23, WWWforEurope.
    6. Portugal, Pedro & Raposo, Pedro, 2015. "Seriously Strengthening the Tax-Benefit Link," IZA Discussion Papers 8785, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Martyn Andrews & Hans-Dieter Gerner & Thorsten Schank & Richard Upward, 2015. "More hours, more jobs? The employment effects of longer working hours," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(2), pages 245-268.

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