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Do reductions of standard hours affect employment transitions? : Evidence from Chile

  • Sánchez, Rafael

    (University of Warwick)

This study exploits the reduction of weekly working hours from 48 to 45 occured in Chile in January 2005. We use this pure and exogenous policy change to identify the employment effects of such a policy. Our main contribution is that we overcome the problems of previous studies such as : selection between hours and employment, lack of identification strategy due to the joint implementation of policies and lack of crucial variables (like hourly wages and usual hours). Our results suggest no significant effects of a reduction of standard hours on employment transitions and a significant effect on hourly wages (i.e. wage compensation). These results are robust to several specifiations.

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Paper provided by University of Warwick, Department of Economics in its series The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) with number 925.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:wrk:warwec:925
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  1. Mikal Skuterud, 2007. "Identifying the Potential of Work-Sharing as a Job-Creation Strategy," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 265-287.
  2. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1993. "Labor Demand and the Source of Adjustment Costs," NBER Working Papers 4394, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Crépon, Bruno & Kramarz, Francis, 2002. "Employed 40 Hours or Not-Employed 39: Lessons from the 1982 Mandatory Reduction of the Workweek," IZA Discussion Papers 416, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Kapteyn, A. & Kalwij, A.S. & Zaidi, M.A., 2000. "The Myth of Worksharing," Discussion Paper 2000-23, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  5. Raposo, Pedro S. & van Ours, Jan C., 2010. "How working time reduction affects jobs and wages," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 106(1), pages 61-63, January.
  6. James Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Jeffrey Smith & Petra Todd, 1998. "Characterizing Selection Bias Using Experimental Data," NBER Working Papers 6699, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Steiner, Viktor & Peters, Ralf-Henning, 2000. "Employment effects of work sharing: an econometric analysis for West Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 00-20, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  8. Santos Raposo, P.M. & van Ours, J.C., 2009. "How a Reduction of Standard Working Hours Affects Employment Dynamics," Discussion Paper 2009-50, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  9. Calmfors, Lars & Hoel, Michael, 1988. " Work Sharing and Overtime," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 90(1), pages 45-62.
  10. Matthieu Chemin & Etienne Wasmer, 2009. "Using Alsace-Moselle Local Laws to Build a Difference-in-Differences Estimation Strategy of the Employment Effects of the 35-Hour Workweek Regulation in France," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(4), pages 487-524, October.
  11. M. J. Andrews & T. Schank & R. Simmons, 2005. "Does Worksharing Work? Some Empirical Evidence From The Iab-Establishment Panel," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 52(2), pages 141-176, 05.
  12. Askenazy, Philippe, 2008. "A Primer on the 35-Hour in France, 1997–2007," IZA Discussion Papers 3402, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Lechner, Michael, 1999. "Identification and Estimation of Causal Effects of Multiple Treatments Under the Conditional Independence Assumption," IZA Discussion Papers 91, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Jennifer Hunt, 1999. "Has Work-Sharing Worked in Germany?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 117-148.
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