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Paid Vacation Use - The Role of Works Councils

Author

Listed:
  • Laszlo Goerke

    () (Institute for Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the EU, University of Trier)

  • Sabrina Jeworrek

    () (Institute for Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the EU, University of Trier)

Abstract

We investigate the relationship between co-determination at the plant level and paid vacation in Germany. From a legal perspective, works councils have no impact on vacation entitlements, but they can affect their use. Employing data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP), we find that male employees who work in an establishment, in which a works council exists, take almost two additional days of paid vacation annually, relative to employees in an establishment without institution. The effect for females is much smaller, if discernible at all. The data suggests that this gender gap might bue due to the fact that women exploit vacation entitlements more comprehensively than men already in the absence of a works council.

Suggested Citation

  • Laszlo Goerke & Sabrina Jeworrek, 2016. "Paid Vacation Use - The Role of Works Councils," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201601, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
  • Handle: RePEc:iaa:dpaper:201601
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Daniel D. Schnitzlein, 2012. "Extent and Effects of Employees in Germany Forgoing Vacation Time," DIW Economic Bulletin, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 2(2), pages 25-31.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender Difference; German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP); Paid Vacation; Works Councils;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions
    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods
    • J53 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Labor-Management Relations; Industrial Jurisprudence
    • M54 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Labor Management

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