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Availability of Family-Friendly Work Practices and Implicit Wage Costs: New Evidence from Canada

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  • Fakih, Ali

    () (Lebanese American University)

Abstract

Using Canadian linked employer-employee data covering the period 1999-2005, I examine the determinants of the availability of family-friendly "care" practices and the impact of such practices on wages. The results show that the provision of family-friendly practices is not mainly derived from socio-demographic characteristics of workers but rather from job- and firm-related factors. The findings also reveal that there is a trade-off between the provision of family-friendly practices and earnings indicating the existence of an implicit market in which workers face reductions in their wages. This result supports the hypothesis that family-friendly benefits are to some extent conceived as a gift or a signal that employers care about employees' family responsibilities and, in return, employees are willing to “buy” these practices and thus accept a wage offset.

Suggested Citation

  • Fakih, Ali, 2014. "Availability of Family-Friendly Work Practices and Implicit Wage Costs: New Evidence from Canada," IZA Discussion Papers 8190, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8190
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Verena Lauber & Johanna Storck, 2016. "Helping with the Kids? How Family-Friendly Workplaces Affect Parental Well-Being and Behavior," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 883, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Verena Lauber & Johanna Storck, 2016. "Helping with the Kids? How Family-Friendly Workplaces Affect Parental Well-Being and Behavior," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1630, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Verena Lauber & Sarah Reiter & Johanna Storck, 2015. "Familienfreundlichkeit in Unternehmen - Status Quo in Deutschland und Forschungsstand," DIW Roundup: Politik im Fokus 77, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Laszlo Goerke & Sabrina Jeworrek, 2016. "Paid Vacation Use - The Role of Works Councils," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201601, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    5. Hofmarcher, Thomas, 2017. "The Effect of Paid Vacation on Health: Evidence from Sweden," Working Papers 2017:13, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    6. Laszlo Goerke & Sabrina Jeworrek & Markus Pannenberg, 2015. "Trade union membership and paid vacation in Germany," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-26, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    family-friendly care practices; linked employer-employee data; simultaneous probit model; wage equation;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions
    • J70 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - General

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