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Sickness Absence and Works Councils: Evidence from German Individual and Linked Employer-Employee Data

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  • Daniel Arnold
  • Tobias Brändle
  • Laszlo Goerke

Abstract

Using both household and linked employer-employee data for Germany, we assess the effects of non-union representation in the form of works councils on (1) individual sickness absence rates and (2) a subjective measure of personnel problems due to sickness absence as perceived by a firm's management. We find that the existence of a works council is positively correlated with the incidence and the annual duration of absence. We observe a more pronounced correlation in western Germany which can also be interpreted causally. Further, personnel problems due to absence are more likely to occur in plants with a works council.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Arnold & Tobias Brändle & Laszlo Goerke, 2014. "Sickness Absence and Works Councils: Evidence from German Individual and Linked Employer-Employee Data," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 691, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp691
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Krzysztof Makarski & Joanna Tyrowicz, 2017. "On welfare effects of increasing retirement age," GRAPE Working Papers 10, GRAPE Group for Research in Applied Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Absenteeism; LIAB; personnel problems; sickness absence; SOEP; works councils;

    JEL classification:

    • J53 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Labor-Management Relations; Industrial Jurisprudence
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • M54 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Labor Management

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