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Commuting and Sickness Absence

Author

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  • Laszlo Goerke

    () (Institute for Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union IAAEU), Trier University)

  • Olga Lorenz

    () (Institute for Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union IAAEU), Trier University)

Abstract

We investigate the causal effect of commuting on sickness absence from work using German panel data. To address reverse causation, we use changes in commuting distance for employees who stay with the same employer and who have the same residence during the period of observation. In contrast to previous papers, we do not observe that commuting distances are associated with higher sickness absence, in general. Only employees who commute long distances are absent about 20% more than employees with no commutes. We explore various explanations for the effect of long distance commutes to work and can find no evidence that it is due to working hours mismatch, lower work effort, reduced leisure time or differences in health status.

Suggested Citation

  • Laszlo Goerke & Olga Lorenz, 2017. "Commuting and Sickness Absence," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201712, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
  • Handle: RePEc:iaa:dpaper:201712
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Shvartsman, Elena & Beckmann, Michael, 2015. "Stressed by your job: What is the role of personnel policy?," Working papers 2015/15, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
    2. repec:eee:jotrge:v:66:y:2018:i:c:p:180-199 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2018. "Commuting Time and Sick-Day Absence of US Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 11700, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Olga Lorenz, 2017. "Does Commuting Matter to Subjective Well-Being?," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201707, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    sickness absence; absenteeism; commuting; health; labour supply;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • R2 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis
    • R40 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - General

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