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Stressed by Your Job: What Is the Role of Personnel Policy?

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  • Elena Shvartsman
  • Michael Beckmann

Abstract

Work-related stress can lead to substantial health problems and thereby result in immense costs for establishments. Therefore, the question as to what extent establishments contribute to their employees’ stress levels is of great importance for firm performance. We investigate the relationship between personnel policies and work-related stress by considering a series of personnel policies that refer to a worker’s job reward, job demand, or job control situation. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) we find statistically significant associations of several policies and work-related stress. Most importantly, bad promotion opportunities and low working time control turn out to be associated with higher stress levels, while the opposite is true for an adequate salary.

Suggested Citation

  • Elena Shvartsman & Michael Beckmann, 2015. "Stressed by Your Job: What Is the Role of Personnel Policy?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 814, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp814
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    Cited by:

    1. Grund, Christian & Rubin, Maike, 2020. "The Role of Employees' Age for the Relation between Job Autonomy and Sickness Absence," IZA Discussion Papers 13945, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    job stress; personnel policy; working conditions;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J81 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Working Conditions
    • M54 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Labor Management

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