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Work-Related Stress, Quitting Intentions and Absenteeism

Author

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  • Leontaridi, Rannia

    (University of Stirling)

  • Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E.

    (European Central Bank)

Abstract

The paper uses data from the International Social Surveys Program (ISSP) to investigate work-related stress among a group of 15 OECD countries. It examines the determinants of work-related stress and explores the importance of work-related stress as a predictor of individuals' quitting behaviour and the rate of absenteeism. We find that those individuals reporting to experience at least some stress in their current position are 10 - 14 % more likely to hold intentions to quit or be absent from work than those without any job stress, with the probability of intending to quit or being absent increasing with successively higher workrelated stress levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Leontaridi, Rannia & Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., 2002. "Work-Related Stress, Quitting Intentions and Absenteeism," IZA Discussion Papers 493, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp493
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shields, Michael A. & Ward, Melanie, 2001. "Improving nurse retention in the National Health Service in England: the impact of job satisfaction on intentions to quit," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 677-701, September.
    2. Andrew Clark & Yannis Georgellis & Peter Sanfey, "undated". "Job Satisfaction, Wage changes and Quits: Evidence from Germany," Economics and Finance Discussion Papers 98-06, Economics and Finance Section, School of Social Sciences, Brunel University.
    3. Leigh, J. Paul, 1991. "Employee and job attributes as predictors of absenteeism in a national sample of workers: The importance of health and dangerous working conditions," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 127-137, January.
    4. George A. Akerlof & Andrew K. Rose & Janet L. Yellen, 1988. "Job Switching and Job Satisfaction in the U.S. Labor Market," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 19(2), pages 495-594.
    5. Brown, Sarah & Sessions, John G, 1996. "The Economics of Absence: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(1), pages 23-53, March.
    6. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1993. "Estimation and Inference in Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195060119.
    7. Allen, Steven G, 1981. "An Empirical Model of Work Attendance," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(1), pages 77-87, February.
    8. Mohammed Chaudhury & Ignace Ng, 1992. "Absenteeism Predictors: Least Squares, Rank Regression, and Model Selection Results," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 25(3), pages 615-635, August.
    9. MacFadyen, Alan J. & MacFadyen, Heather Wood & Prince, Nancy J., 1996. "Economic stress and psychological well-being: An economic psychology framework," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 291-311, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. González Álvarez, Mª Luz & Gamero-Burón, Carlos, 2013. "Coste de las visitas médicas y urgencias asociadas al estrés laboral en España/Health Care Costs Due to Job Stress in Spain," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 31, pages 417-444, Septiembr.
    2. Jones, Melanie K & Latreille, Paul L & Sloane, Peter J, 2011. "NILS Working paper no 180. Job anxiety, work-related psychological illness and workplace performance," NILS Working Papers 26078, National Institute of Labour Studies.
    3. María José Suárez & Cristina Muñiz, 2018. "Unobserved heterogeneity in work absence," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 19(8), pages 1137-1148, November.
    4. Atif Atique Siddiqui & Raja Ahmed Jamil, 2015. "Antecedents of Employees’ Turnover Intentions: Evidence from Private Educational Institutions," American Journal of Economics and Business Administration, Science Publications, vol. 7(4), pages 160-165, November.
    5. Takahashi, Ana Maria, 2016. "Job stress in Japanese academia: The role of relative income, time allocation by task, and children," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 12-17.
    6. Gamero-Burón, Carlos, 2010. "Evaluación del coste por pérdida de jornadas laborales asociado al estrés laboral: propuesta para España/Assessing the Cost of Lost Working Days Associated With Job Stress: A Proposal for Spain," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 28, pages 689(20á)-68, Diciembre.
    7. Razan Saleh Al Zadjali & Omer Ali Ibrahim, 2021. "The Impact of Absenteeism in Banking Sector in Oman," International Review of Management and Marketing, Econjournals, vol. 11(2), pages 23-29.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    job stress; quits; turnover; absenteeism;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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