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Work absences and doctor visits during an illness episode: The differential role of preferences, production, and policies among men and women

  • Gilleskie, Donna

This paper analyzes the absenteeism and medical care consumption behavior of employed men and women during an episode of acute illness. An individual's daily optimization decisions are modeled in a dynamic framework to evaluate the role of (1) preferences for absences and treatment, (2) effectiveness of these inputs on recovery, and (3) economic incentives in determining the number and timing of absences and doctor visits and the duration of illness. In general, men appear to be more responsive than women to changes in sick leave and health insurance mainly due to differences in preferences.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VC0-4X7R85S-4/2/6a0807154464430f265eab1fd69e73e3
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Econometrics.

Volume (Year): 156 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (May)
Pages: 148-163

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Handle: RePEc:eee:econom:v:156:y:2010:i:1:p:148-163
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jeconom

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  8. Per Johansson & Mårten Palme, 2002. "Assessing the Effect of Public Policy on Worker Absenteeism," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(2), pages 381-409.
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  16. Morris A. Davis & E. Michael Foster, 2005. "A Stochastic Dynamic Model Of The Mental Health Of Children," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(3), pages 837-866, 08.
  17. Mohammed Chaudhury & Ignace Ng, 1992. "Absenteeism Predictors: Least Squares, Rank Regression, and Model Selection Results," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 25(3), pages 615-35, August.
  18. Khwaja, Ahmed, 2010. "Estimating willingness to pay for medicare using a dynamic life-cycle model of demand for health insurance," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 156(1), pages 130-147, May.
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