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Labor Market Effects of U.S. Sick Pay Mandates

Author

Listed:
  • Stefan Pichler

    (ETH Zurich)

  • Nicolas Ziebarth

    (Cornell University)

Abstract

This paper exploits temporal and spatial variation in the implementation of nine-city- and four state-level U.S. sick pay mandates to assess their labor market consequences. We use the synthetic control group method and traditional difference-in-differences models along with the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages to estimate the causal effects of mandated sick pay on employment and wages. We do not find much evidence that employment or wages were significantly affected by the mandates that typically allow employees to earn one hour of paid sick leave per work week, up to seven days per year. Employment decreases of 2 percent lie outside the 92 percent confidence interval and wage decreases of 3 percent lie outside the 95 percent confidence interval.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefan Pichler & Nicolas Ziebarth, 2018. "Labor Market Effects of U.S. Sick Pay Mandates," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 18-293, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:weupjo:18-293
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    Cited by:

    1. Pichler, Stefan & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2017. "The pros and cons of sick pay schemes: Testing for contagious presenteeism and noncontagious absenteeism behavior," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 14-33.
    2. Pichler, Stefan & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2016. "Labor Market Effects of US Sick Pay Mandates," IZA Discussion Papers 9867, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. repec:eee:labeco:v:51:y:2018:i:c:p:227-246 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Kevin Callison & Michael F. Pesko, 2016. "The Effect of Mandatory Paid Sick Leave Laws on Labor Market Outcomes, Health Care Utilization, and Health Behaviors," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 16-265, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

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    Keywords

    sick pay mandates; sick leave; medical leave; employer mandates; employment; wages; synthetic control group method (SCGM); Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW); United States (U.S.);

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions

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