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Long-term Illness and Wages: The Impact of the Risk of Occupationally Related Long-term Illness on Earnings

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  • Robert Sandy
  • Robert F. Elliott

Abstract

Long-term illness (LTI) is a more prevalent workplace risk than fatal accidents but there is virtually no evidence for compensating differentials for a broad measure of LTI. In 1990 almost 3.4 percent of the U.K. adult population suffered from a LTI caused solely by their working conditions. This paper provides the first estimates of compensating differentials for a broad measure of work-related LTI. Using data on self-reported illnesses we find significant CDs for male manual workers but none for male nonmanual workers. These results are robust to the addition of variables for the risk of accidental at-work deaths.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Sandy & Robert F. Elliott, 2005. "Long-term Illness and Wages: The Impact of the Risk of Occupationally Related Long-term Illness on Earnings," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(3).
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:40:y:2005:i:2:p744-768
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stefan Pichler & Nicolas R. Ziebarth, 2015. "The Pros and Cons of Sick Pay Schemes: Testing for Contagious Presenteeism and Shirking Behavior," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1509, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Johanna Catherine Maclean & Stefan Pichler & Nicolas R. Ziebarth, 2020. "Mandated Sick Pay: Coverage, Utilization, and Welfare Effects," NBER Working Papers 26832, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Xiangdong Wei, 2007. "Wage compensation for job-related illness: Evidence from a matched employer and employee survey in the UK," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 85-98, February.
    4. Pichler, Stefan & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2015. "The Pros and Cons of Sick Pay Schemes: A Method to Test for Contagious Presenteeism and Shirking Behavior," IZA Discussion Papers 8850, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Urtasun, Ainhoa & Nuñez, Imanol, 2018. "Healthy working days: The (positive) effect of work effort on occupational health from a human capital approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 202(C), pages 79-88.
    6. Konstantinos, Pouliakas & Ioannis, Theodossiou, 2010. "An Inquiry Into the Theory, Causes and Consequences of Monitoring Indicators of Health and Safety At Work," MPRA Paper 20336, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Stefan Pichler & Nicolas R. Ziebarth, 2020. "Labor Market Effects of U.S. Sick Pay Mandates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 55(2), pages 611-659.
    8. Frijters, Paul & Johnston, David W. & Shields, Michael A., 2008. "Happiness Dynamics with Quarterly Life Event Data," IZA Discussion Papers 3604, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Pichler, Stefan & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2017. "The pros and cons of sick pay schemes: Testing for contagious presenteeism and noncontagious absenteeism behavior," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 14-33.
    10. Benkhalifa, Abdelaziz, 2010. "The value of mortality risk reductions in the Tunisian building and manufacturing industries," MPRA Paper 63617, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Mark V. Pauly & Sean Nicholson & Daniel Polsky & Marc L. Berger & Claire Sharda, 2008. "Valuing reductions in on‐the‐job illness: ‘presenteeism’ from managerial and economic perspectives," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(4), pages 469-485, April.
    12. Robert Elliott & Ada Ma & Matt Sutton & Diane Skatun & Nigel Rice & Stephen Morris & Alex McConnachie, 2010. "The role of the staff MFF in distributing NHS funding: taking account of differences in local labour market conditions," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(5), pages 532-548, May.
    13. Benkhalifa, Abdelaziz, 2014. "Rôle du syndicat dans la détermination de la valeur de la vie statistique en Tunisie [Trade union role in determining the value of a statistical life in Tunisia]," MPRA Paper 63736, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Pichler, Stefan & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2019. "Reprint of: The pros and cons of sick pay schemes: Testing for contagious presenteeism and noncontagious absenteeism behavior," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 171(C), pages 86-104.

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