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Sickness Absence: An International Comparison

Author

Listed:
  • Tim A. Barmby

    (University of Newcastle upon Tyne)

  • Marco G. Ercolani

    (University of Essex)

  • John G. Treble

    (University of Wales, Bangor)

Abstract

This paper shows how internationally and intertemporally consistent information on sickness absence can be constructed from Labour Force Surveys, and describes some important features of data that we have generated using the Luxembourg Employment Study. We also analyse sickness absence rates by age, gender and other socio-economic characteristics of workers. These relationships prove to be similar across countries with widely differing mean rates of absence. In this dataset, workers with longer tenure tend to have higher absence rates even when age is controlled for. Absence is also positively correlated with higher usual hours of work. Copyright 2002 Royal Economic Society

Suggested Citation

  • Tim A. Barmby & Marco G. Ercolani & John G. Treble, 2002. "Sickness Absence: An International Comparison," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages 315-331, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:112:y:2002:i:480:p:f315-f331
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Barmby, T A & Orme, C D & Treble, John G, 1991. "Worker Absenteeism: An Analysis Using Microdata," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(405), pages 214-229, March.
    2. Barmby, Tim & Orme, Chris & Treble, John, 1995. "Worker absence histories: a panel data study," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 53-65, March.
    3. Coles, Melvyn G. & Treble, John G., 1993. "The price of worker reliability," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 149-155.
    4. Johansson, Per & Palme, Mårten, 1998. "Assessing the effect of a compulsory sickness insurance on worker absenteeism," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 287, Stockholm School of Economics.
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