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Absenteeism in Apprenticeships: What Role Do Works Councils Play?

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  • Harald Pfeifer

    () (Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training (BIBB) Bonn, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA) Maastricht)

Abstract

This paper examines the influence of works councils on apprentices’ absence from the workplace in Germany. The analysis draws on merged administrative and survey data that includes information about the cumulated days apprentices are absent from work due to sickness reasons. On average, apprentices report sick on nine working days per year, whereas strong differences exist with respect to the training occupation and firmsize. Regression results imply that the existence of a works council in a firm significantly reduces apprentices’ absence. The results suggest that works councils effectively exercise their legally anchored ‘voice’ function in the German apprenticeship system.

Suggested Citation

  • Harald Pfeifer, 2014. "Absenteeism in Apprenticeships: What Role Do Works Councils Play?," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0098, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Aug 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:iso:educat:0098
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    File URL: http://repec.business.uzh.ch/RePEc/iso/leadinghouse/0098_lhwpaper.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Arnold & Tobias Brändle & Laszlo Goerke, 2014. "Sickness Absence and Works Councils - Evidence from German Individual and Linked Employer-Employee Data," IAW Discussion Papers 107, Institut für Angewandte Wirtschaftsforschung (IAW).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Absenteeism; Apprenticeship Training; Works Councils;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J52 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Dispute Resolution: Strikes, Arbitration, and Mediation
    • K31 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Labor Law

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