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Worker absence histories: a panel data study

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  • Barmby, Tim
  • Orme, Chris
  • Treble, John

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  • Barmby, Tim & Orme, Chris & Treble, John, 1995. "Worker absence histories: a panel data study," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 53-65, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:2:y:1995:i:1:p:53-65
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kahana, Nava & Weiss, Avi, 1992. "Absenteeism: A comparison of incentives in alternative organizations," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 573-595, December.
    2. Woodbury, Stephen A, 1983. "Substitution between Wage and Nonwage Benefits," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(1), pages 166-182, March.
    3. Dunn, L F & Youngblood, Stuart A, 1986. "Absenteeism as a Mechanism for Approaching an Optimal Labor Market Equilibrium: An Empirical Study," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(4), pages 668-674, November.
    4. Barmby, T A & Orme, C D & Treble, John G, 1991. "Worker Absenteeism: An Analysis Using Microdata," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(405), pages 214-229, March.
    5. Davies, Richard B & Elias, Peter & Penn, Roger, 1992. "The Relationship between a Husband's Unemployment and His Wife's Participation in the Labour Force," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 54(2), pages 145-171, May.
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