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Reporting sick: are sporting events contagious?

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  • Peter Skogman Thoursie

    (Department of Economics, Stockholm University, Sweden, and National Social Insurance Board, Sweden)

Abstract

Moral hazard is easy to justify theoretically but difficult to detect empirically. Individuals may report sick due to illness as well as for moral hazard reasons. Potential abuse of the sickness insurance system in Sweden is estimated by comparing the change between the number of men and women who report sick during a popular sporting event and a preceding time period. Difference-in-differences estimates provide clear evidence that the number of men who reported sick increased in order to watch the sporting event on television. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Skogman Thoursie, 2004. "Reporting sick: are sporting events contagious?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(6), pages 809-823.
  • Handle: RePEc:jae:japmet:v:19:y:2004:i:6:p:809-823
    DOI: 10.1002/jae.758
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    Cited by:

    1. René Böheim & Thomas Leoni, 2020. "Absenteeism on bridging days," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(20), pages 1667-1671, November.
    2. Richard Duhautois & Bastien Drut, 2017. "Is work duration in France affected by football tournaments?," Economics and Business Letters, Oviedo University Press, vol. 6(1), pages 14-19.
    3. Barbara Hofmann, 2014. "Sick of being “Activated?”," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 1103-1127, November.
    4. Lozano, Fernando A., 2012. "What Happened to God's Time? The Evolution of Secularism and Hours of Work in America, Evidence from Religious Holidays," IZA Discussion Papers 6552, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Assar Lindbeck, 2006. "Sustainable social spending," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 13(4), pages 303-324, August.
    6. Lindbeck, Assar, 2008. "Prospects for the Welfare State," Seminar Papers 755, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    7. Hesselius, Patrik, 2003. "Does Sick Absence Increase the Risk of Unemployment?," Working Paper Series 2003:15, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    8. Johansson, Per & Karimi, Arizo & Nilsson, Peter, 2014. "Gender differences in shirking: monitoring or social preferences? Evidence from a field experiment," Working Paper Series 2014:9, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    9. Martin Halla & Mario Lackner & Friedrich G. Schneider, 2010. "An Empirical Analysis of the Dynamics of the Welfare State: The Case of Benefit Morale," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(1), pages 55-74, February.
    10. Daniela Andrén, 2003. "Sickness-related Absenteeism and Economic Incentives in Sweden: A History of Reforms," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 1(03), pages 54-60, February.
    11. Lindbeck, Assar, 2003. "Improving the Performance of the European Social Model - The Welfare State over the Life Cycle," Working Paper Series 587, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    12. Lusine Lusinyan & Leo Bonato, 2007. "Work Absence in Europe," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 54(3), pages 475-538, July.
    13. Doerrenberg, Philipp & Siegloch, Sebastian, 2014. "Is soccer good for you? The motivational impact of big sporting events on the unemployed," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 123(1), pages 66-69.
    14. Assar Lindbeck, 2003. "An Essay on Welfare State Dynamics," CESifo Working Paper Series 976, CESifo.
    15. Fernando A Lozano, 2011. "The Flexibility Of The Workweek In The United States: Evidence From The Fifa World Cup," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(2), pages 512-529, April.
    16. Andrén, Daniela, 2004. "“Never on a Sunday”: Economic Incentives and Sick Leave in Sweden," Working Papers in Economics 136, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    17. Andrea Ichino & Enrico Moretti, 2009. "Biological Gender Differences, Absenteeism, and the Earnings Gap," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 183-218, January.
    18. Pathric Hägglund & Per Johansson & Lisa Laun, 2020. "The Impact of CBT on Sick Leave and Health," Evaluation Review, , vol. 44(2-3), pages 185-217, April.
    19. Martin Ljunge, 2012. "The Spirit of the Welfare State? Adaptation in the Demand for Social Insurance," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(3), pages 187-223.
    20. Hesselius, Patrik, 2007. "Does sickness absence increase the risk of unemployment?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 288-310, April.
    21. Thoursie, Peter Skogman, 2007. "Happy birthday! You're insured! Gender differences in work ethics," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 141-145, January.
    22. Thomas Leoni & René Böheim, 2018. "Fehlzeitenreport 2018. Krankheits- und unfallbedingte Fehlzeiten in Österreich Präsentismus und Absentismus," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 61487, June.
    23. repec:ces:ifodic:v:1:y:2003:i:3:p:14567920 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. Heywood, John S. & Jirjahn, Uwe & Wei, Xiangdong, 2008. "Teamwork, monitoring and absence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 68(3-4), pages 676-690, December.
    25. Daniela Andrén, 2003. "Sickness-related Absenteeism and Economic Incentives in Sweden: A History of Reforms," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 1(3), pages 54-60, 02.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J29 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Other

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