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The influence of disability on absenteeism: an empirical analysis using Spanish data

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  • Garcia-Serrano, Carlos
  • Malo, Miguel A.

Abstract

Using data from the European Community Household Panel for Spain covering the period 1995-2001, this paper investigates the influence of disability on absenteeism reported by workers. Results show that workers with disabilities are absent more days than workers without disabilities. This finding holds even when individual’s selfreported health, visits to doctors and nights spent in hospitals are included in the estimations. The total effect of disability on absenteeism amounts to a marginal increase of 6-10 days per year. Implications for labour policy are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Garcia-Serrano, Carlos & Malo, Miguel A., 2008. "The influence of disability on absenteeism: an empirical analysis using Spanish data," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-29, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2008-29
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2008-29.pdf
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    2. Veliziotis, Michail, 2010. "Unionization and sickness absence from work in the UK," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-15, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Sabine Chaupain-Guillot & Olivier Guillot, 2010. "Les déterminants individuels des absences au travail : une comparaison européenne," Working Papers of BETA 2010-17, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.

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