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Assimilation of the migrant work ethic

Author

Listed:
  • Dawson Chris

    (University of Bath)

  • Veliziotis Michail

    (University of the West of England, Bristol)

  • Hopkins Benjamin

    (University of Aberystwyth)

Abstract

Over the last decade the UK has experienced unprecedented increases in migration associated with the 2004 A8 expansion of the EU. This paper studies the work ethic of these recent migrants by analysing worker absence data from the Labour Force Survey for the period 2005-2012. The results show that when A8 migrant workers first arrive in the UK they have substantially lower absenteeism than native workers, but importantly migrant absence levels assimilate within 4-7 years. If UK employers use this information to make hiring decisions, then unusually productive native workers will suffer, this is however only likely to occur in the short term.

Suggested Citation

  • Dawson Chris & Veliziotis Michail & Hopkins Benjamin, 2014. "Assimilation of the migrant work ethic," Working Papers 20141407, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:20141407
    as

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    File URL: http://www2.uwe.ac.uk/faculties/BBS/BUS/Research/Economics%20Papers%202014/1407.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; assimilation; absenteeism;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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