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Changes in commuting to work times over the 1990 to 2000 period

Author

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  • Kirby, Dustin K.
  • LeSage, James P.

Abstract

Travel times to work from the 2000 Census show an increase in average commuting times that is difficult to reconcile with the viewpoint expressed in earlier literature that suburbanization has provided a solution by acting as a traffic "safety valve", preventing a "traffic doomsday" from occurring in the face of urban growth. We examine commuting times to work using US tract-level Census data for the years 1990 and 2000. A spatial econometric modeling approach that allows us to distinguish between commuting time congestion spillover impacts arising from shared roadways is developed. We compare the influence of 1990 and 2000 tract-level characteristics of residents that give rise to long commute times (over 45Â min).

Suggested Citation

  • Kirby, Dustin K. & LeSage, James P., 2009. "Changes in commuting to work times over the 1990 to 2000 period," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 460-471, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:39:y:2009:i:4:p:460-471
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Arnott, Richard & de Palma, Andre & Lindsey, Robin, 1990. "Economics of a bottleneck," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 111-130, January.
    2. Crane, Randall, 2007. "Is There a Quiet Revolution in Women's Travel? Revisiting the Gender Gap in Commuting," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt8nj9n8nb, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Gordon, Peter & Kumar, Ajay & Richardson, Harry W., 1989. "The influence of metropolitan spatial structure on commuting time," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 138-151, September.
    4. repec:spr:stemec:978-3-7908-2070-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. J. Barkley Rosser, 2009. "Introduction," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Complexity, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Parent, Olivier & LeSage, James P., 2010. "A spatial dynamic panel model with random effects applied to commuting times," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 44(5), pages 633-645, June.
    2. Lorenz, Olga & Goerke, Laszlo, 2015. "Commuting and Sickness Absence," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113173, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2015. "Excess Commuting in the US: Differences between the Self-Employed and Employees," IZA Discussion Papers 9425, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Rafael Henrique Moraes Pereira & Tim Schwanen, 2013. "Commute Time in Brazil (1992-2009): Differences Between Metropolitan Areas, by Income Levels and Gender," Discussion Papers 1813a, Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - IPEA.
    5. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2016. "A Wage-Efficiency Spatial Model for US Self-Employed Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 9634, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. José Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal & José Alberto Molina & Jorge Velilla, 2016. "Spatial distribution of US employment in an urban wage-efficiency setting," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 890, Boston College Department of Economics.
    7. Angelo Antoci & Simone Borghesi & Gerardo Marletto, 2012. "To drive or not to drive? A simple evolutionary model," ECONOMICS AND POLICY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2012(2), pages 31-47.
    8. Mulholland, Sean E. & Hernandez-Julian, Rey, 2013. "Does Economic Freedom Lead to Selective Migration By Education?," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 43(1).
    9. Laszlo Goerke & Olga Lorenz, 2017. "Commuting and Sickness Absence," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 946, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. Paul Elhorst & Solmaria Halleck Vega, 2013. "On spatial econometric models, spillover effects, and W," ERSA conference papers ersa13p222, European Regional Science Association.
    11. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2016. "Commuting Time and Sex Ratios in the US," IZA Discussion Papers 9933, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. J. Ignacio, Giménez-Nadal & Jose Alberto, Molina & Jorge, Velilla, 2017. "Leisure and effort at work: incorporating self-employment into urban markets," MPRA Paper 77972, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Arnstein Gjestland & David McArthur & Liv Osland & Inge Thorsen, 2011. "Relationships between housing prices and commuting flows," ERSA conference papers ersa10p906, European Regional Science Association.
    14. repec:elg:eechap:14395_1 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. James LeSage & Matthew Dominguez, 2012. "The importance of modeling spatial spillovers in public choice analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 150(3), pages 525-545, March.

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