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Stress perception and commuting

Author

Listed:
  • Georg Gottholmseder

    (Austrian Federal Ministry of Finance, Vienna, Austria)

  • Klaus Nowotny

    (Austrian Institute for Economic Research WIFO, Vienna, Austria)

  • Gerald J. Pruckner

    (Department of Economics, University of Linz, Linz, Austria)

  • Engelbert Theurl

    (Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck, Austria)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the determinants of the perceived stress level of workers with a special focus on the effects of commuting, while controlling for personal and work-related characteristics. Using ordered logistic regression we find that several dimensions of the commuting situation, such as impedance, control and predictability of commuting, significantly influence the perceived stress level. Therefore, stress and stress-related health problems should be taken into consideration when analyzing the economic costs of commuting. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Georg Gottholmseder & Klaus Nowotny & Gerald J. Pruckner & Engelbert Theurl, 2009. "Stress perception and commuting," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(5), pages 559-576.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:18:y:2009:i:5:p:559-576
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1389
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1389
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David T. Ory & Patricia L. Mokhtarian & Lothlorien S. Redmond & Ilan Salomon & Gustavo O. Collantes & Sangho Choo, 2004. "When is Commuting Desirable to the Individual?," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(3), pages 334-359.
    2. Novaco, Raymond W. & Kliewer, Wendy & Broquet, Alexander, 1991. "Home Environment Consequences of Commute Travel Impedance," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt1d5742g7, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Lothlorien Redmond & Patricia Mokhtarian, 2001. "The positive utility of the commute: modeling ideal commute time and relative desired commute amount," Transportation, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 179-205, May.
    4. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Salomon, Ilan, 2001. "How derived is the demand for travel? Some conceptual and measurement considerations," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 695-719, September.
    5. Richard Wener & Gary Evans & Donald Phillips & Natasha Nadler, 2003. "Running for the 7:45: The effects of public transit improvements on commuter stress," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 203-220, May.
    6. Novaco, Raymond W. & Stokols, Daniel & Milanesi, Louis, 1990. "Objective and Subjective Dimensions Of Travel Impedance as Determinants Of Commuting Stress," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt5jq8164z, University of California Transportation Center.
    7. Novaco, Raymond W. & Stokols, Daniel & Milanesi, Louis, 1990. "Objective and Subjective Dimensions Of Travel Impedance as Determinants Of Commuting and Stress," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt10m3x16k, University of California Transportation Center.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lee, Richard J. & Sener, Ipek N., 2016. "Transportation planning and quality of life: Where do they intersect?," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 146-155.
    2. Wolff, Hendrik, 2014. "Value of time: Speeding behavior and gasoline prices," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 71-88.
    3. Roberts, Jennifer & Hodgson, Robert & Dolan, Paul, 2011. "“It's driving her mad”: Gender differences in the effects of commuting on psychological health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1064-1076.
    4. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2018. "Telework, the Timing of Work, and Instantaneous Well-Being: Evidence from Time Use Data," IZA Discussion Papers 11271, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. repec:wfo:wstudy:45900 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Louis-Philippe Beland & Daniel A. Brent, 2017. "Traffic and Crime," Departmental Working Papers 2017-02, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    7. Lorenz, Olga & Goerke, Laszlo, 2015. "Commuting and Sickness Absence," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113173, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    8. Künn-Nelen, Annemarie, 2015. "Does Commuting Affect Health?," IZA Discussion Papers 9031, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Peter Bäckström & Erika Sandow & Olle Westerlund, 2016. "Commuting and timing of retirement," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 56(1), pages 125-152, January.
    10. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2015. "Excess Commuting in the US: Differences between the Self-Employed and Employees," IZA Discussion Papers 9425, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Morris, Eric A., 2015. "Should we all just stay home? Travel, out-of-home activities, and life satisfaction," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 519-536.
    12. Patricia Mokhtarian & Francis Papon & Matthieu Goulard & Marco Diana, 2015. "What makes travel pleasant and/or tiring? An investigation based on the French National Travel Survey," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(6), pages 1103-1128, November.
    13. Peter Bäckström & Erika Sandow & Olle Westerlund, 2016. "Commuting and timing of retirement," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 56(1), pages 125-152, January.
    14. Oliveira, Rodrigo & Moura, Klebson & Viana, Jorge & Tigre, Robson & Sampaio, Breno, 2015. "Commute duration and health: Empirical evidence from Brazil," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 62-75.
    15. repec:eee:pubeco:v:160:y:2018:i:c:p:96-116 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Olga Lorenz, 2017. "Does Commuting Matter to Subjective Well-Being?," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201707, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).

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