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Stress perception and commuting

  • Georg Gottholmseder

    (Austrian Federal Ministry of Finance, Vienna, Austria)

  • Klaus Nowotny

    (Austrian Institute for Economic Research WIFO, Vienna, Austria)

  • Gerald J. Pruckner

    (Department of Economics, University of Linz, Linz, Austria)

  • Engelbert Theurl

    (Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck, Austria)

This paper analyzes the determinants of the perceived stress level of workers with a special focus on the effects of commuting, while controlling for personal and work-related characteristics. Using ordered logistic regression we find that several dimensions of the commuting situation, such as impedance, control and predictability of commuting, significantly influence the perceived stress level. Therefore, stress and stress-related health problems should be taken into consideration when analyzing the economic costs of commuting. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1389
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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 18 (2009)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 559-576

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Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:18:y:2009:i:5:p:559-576
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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  1. Novaco, Raymond W. & Kliewer, Wendy & Broquet, Alexander, 1991. "Home Environment Consequences of Commute Travel Impedance," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt1d5742g7, University of California Transportation Center.
  2. Mokhtarian, Patricia & Salomon, Ilan, 2001. "How Derived is the Demand for Travel? Some Conceptual and Measurement Considerations," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt1z26n1r8, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
  3. Novaco, Raymond W. & Stokols, Daniel & Milanesi, Louis, 1990. "Objective and Subjective Dimensions Of Travel Impedance as Determinants Of Commuting and Stress," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt10m3x16k, University of California Transportation Center.
  4. Redmond, Lothlorien S. & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2001. "The Positive Utility of the Commute: Modeling Ideal Commute Time and Relative Desired Commute Amount," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4mc291p2, University of California Transportation Center.
  5. Ory, David T. & Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Redmond, Lothlorien S. & Collantes, Gustavo O. & Choo, Sangho, 2004. "When is Commuting Desirable to the Individual?," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt1nm9v26h, University of California Transportation Center.
  6. Richard Wener & Gary Evans & Donald Phillips & Natasha Nadler, 2003. "Running for the 7:45: The effects of public transit improvements on commuter stress," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 203-220, May.
  7. Novaco, Raymond W. & Stokols, Daniel & Milanesi, Louis, 1990. "Objective and Subjective Dimensions Of Travel Impedance as Determinants Of Commuting Stress," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt5jq8164z, University of California Transportation Center.
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