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Enjoyment of commute: A comparison of different transportation modes

  • Páez, Antonio
  • Whalen, Kate
Registered author(s):

    This study investigates how socio-demographic and attitudinal variables of university students affect their desire to increase or decrease their daily commute. The case study is McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, and data was obtained by means of a web-based survey that included questions regarding travel behavior, socio-demographic information, and attitudes toward travel, land use, and the environment. The objective variable is defined as the ratio of ideal to actual commute time, and regression analysis is implemented to test the relationship between this variable and socio-demographic variables and attitudinal scores. The impact of different attitudes on the gap between ideal and actual commute time is expanded to include three different modes, active travel (walk/cycle), transit, and personal automobile. Interestingly, the results indicate that active travelers tend to be less dissatisfied with their commute, followed by those who travel in a personal vehicle and transit users. A number of attitudinal responses are shown to impact the desire to travel more or less, including variables that relate to the social environment, availability of local activities, quality of facilities, productive use of the commute, and the intrinsic value found in the commute travel. The picture emerges of a traveler who would like to spend more time commuting, as someone who is an active traveler, thinks that getting there is half the fun, dislikes traveling alone, but rather likes to live in an active neighborhood where there is a sense of community. The results suggests that enjoyment of commuting, while a challenge from the perspective of motorized mobility, may provide valuable policy opportunities from the perspective of active transportation.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice.

    Volume (Year): 44 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 7 (August)
    Pages: 537-549

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:44:y:2010:i:7:p:537-549
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