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How do individuals adapt their personal travel? A conceptual exploration of the consideration of travel-related strategies

  • Cao, Xinyu
  • Mokhtarian, Patricia L.

Preparatory to an empirical analysis, this study conceptually discusses the influences of objective and subjective variables on the consideration of 16 travel-related strategies, reflecting a range of options individuals have to adapt to congestion. The variables considered here were measured by a 1998 survey conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area. The conceptual exploration shows that the consideration of travel-related strategies may be affected by the amounts of travel that individuals actually do, their subjective assessments, desires, affinities, and constraints with respect to travel. Individuals' travel attitudes, personality, lifestyle and prior experience are also likely to affect their current consideration. Socio-economic and demographic characteristics may exhibit distributional effects with respect to the options individuals consider. These potential influences indicate that the individual adaptation process may be influenced by a wide range of qualitative and experiential variables, which are often ignored or omitted by policy makers and planners. A companion paper develops binary logit models of the consideration of each strategy.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transport Policy.

Volume (Year): 12 (2005)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 199-206

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Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:12:y:2005:i:3:p:199-206
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  1. Cao, Xinyu & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2005. "How do individuals adapt their personal travel? Objective and subjective influences on the consideration of travel-related strategies for San Francisco Bay Area commuters," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt45k3391f, University of California Transportation Center.
  2. Bhattacharjee, Debashish & Haider, S. Waqar & Tanaboriboon, Yordphol & Sinha, Kumares C., 1997. "Commuters' attitudes towards travel demand management in Bangkok," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 161-170, July.
  3. Michael J. Clay * & Patricia L. Mokhtarian, 2004. "Personal travel management: the adoption and consideration of travel-related strategies," Transportation Planning and Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 181-209, June.
  4. Ison, S., 2000. "Local authority and academic attitudes to urban road pricing: a UK perspective," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 269-277, October.
  5. Arentze, Theo & Hofman, Frank & Timmermans, Harry, 2004. "Predicting multi-faceted activity-travel adjustment strategies in response to possible congestion pricing scenarios using an Internet-based stated adaptation experiment," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 31-41, January.
  6. Sangho Choo & Gustavo Collantes & Patricia Mokhtarian, 2005. "Wanting to travel, more or less: Exploring the determinants of the deficit and surfeit of personal travel," Transportation, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 135-164, 03.
  7. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Raney, Elizabeth A. & Salomon, Ilan, 1997. "Behavioral response to congestion: identifying patterns and socio-economic differences in adoption," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2v5869bd, University of California Transportation Center.
  8. Eric Hildebrand, 2003. "Dimensions in elderly travel behaviour: A simplified activity-based model using lifestyle clusters," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 285-306, August.
  9. Cullinane, Sharon, 1992. "Attitudes towards the car in the U.K.: Some implications for policies on congestion and the environment," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 291-301, July.
  10. Mokhtarian, Patricia L & Salomon, Ilan & S, Lothlorien, 2001. "Understanding the Demand for Travel: It's Not Purely 'Derived'," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt5bh2d8mh, University of California Transportation Center.
  11. Drolet, Aimee, 2002. " Inherent Rule Variability in Consumer Choice: Changing Rules for Change's Sake," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(3), pages 293-305, December.
  12. Salomon, Ilan & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 1997. "Coping with Congestion: Understanding the Gap Between Policy Assumptions and Behavior," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4bh3b670, University of California Transportation Center.
  13. Thorpe, Neil & Hills, Peter & Jaensirisak, Sittha, 2000. "Public attitudes to TDM measures: a comparative study," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 243-257, October.
  14. Plaut, Pnina O., 1997. "Transportation-communications relationships in industry," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 419-429, November.
  15. Bin, Shui & Dowlatabadi, Hadi, 2005. "Consumer lifestyle approach to US energy use and the related CO2 emissions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 197-208, January.
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