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What Happens When Mobility-Inclined Market Segments Face Accessibility-Enhancing Policies?

  • Salomon, Ilan
  • Mokhtarian, Patricia

Improvements in accessibility are increasingly suggested as strategies leading to a reduction in vehicular travel, congestion, pollution and their related impacts. This approach assumes that individuals, if offered an opportunity, are likely to reduce their travel. It also assumes that accessibility-enhancing land-use changes will increase transit and non-motorized trips in lieu of automobile usage. However, there are numerous indications that people engage in excess travel and are not necessarily inclined to reduce it. This paper presents a number of hypotheses on the reasons for excess travel and the relationships among attitudes toward travel and responses to accessibility-enhancing strategies. It suggests that different market segments are likely to respond to policy measures in different ways. In particular, if a large segment of the population prefers mobility over the reduced travel offered by accessibility improvements, then such policies will be less effective than anticipated.

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Paper provided by Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis in its series Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series with number qt2x75525j.

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Date of creation: 01 May 1998
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Handle: RePEc:cdl:itsdav:qt2x75525j
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  1. Small, Kenneth A & Song, Shunfeng, 1992. ""Wasteful" Commuting: A Resolution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 888-98, August.
  2. S L Handy & D A Niemeier, 1997. "Measuring accessibility: an exploration of issues and alternatives," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 29(7), pages 1175-1194, July.
  3. Wachs, Martin, 1994. "Will Congestion Pricing Ever Be Adopted?," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt98r1z5rj, University of California Transportation Center.
  4. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Raney, Elizabeth A. & Salomon, Ilan, 1997. "Behavioral response to congestion: identifying patterns and socio-economic differences in adoption," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2v5869bd, University of California Transportation Center.
  5. Patricia Mokhtarian & Ilan Salomon, 2005. "Modeling the Choice of Telecommuting 2: A Case of the Preferred Impossible Alternative," Labor and Demography 0505009, EconWPA.
  6. Giuliano, Genevieve, 1991. "Is Jobs-Housing Balance a Transportation Issue?," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4874r4hg, University of California Transportation Center.
  7. I Salomon & M Ben-Akiva, 1983. "The use of the life-style concept in travel demand models," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 15(5), pages 623-638, May.
  8. Handy, Susan, 1993. "Regional Versus Local Accessibility: Implications for Nonwork Travel," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2z79q67d, University of California Transportation Center.
  9. Webber, Melvin M., 1992. "The Joys of Automobility," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3pb4j3sg, University of California Transportation Center.
  10. Cullinane, Sharon, 1992. "Attitudes towards the car in the U.K.: Some implications for policies on congestion and the environment," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 291-301, July.
  11. Button, Kenneth J., 1994. "Alternative approaches toward containing transport externalities: An international comparison," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 289-305, July.
  12. Handy, Susan, 1994. "Highway Blues: Nothing a Little Accessibility Can't Cure," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt66k8b8bz, University of California Transportation Center.
  13. Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 1990. "A Typology of Relationships Between Telecommunications And Transportation," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4rx589m0, University of California Transportation Center.
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