IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/transa/v26y1992i4p291-301.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Attitudes towards the car in the U.K.: Some implications for policies on congestion and the environment

Author

Listed:
  • Cullinane, Sharon

Abstract

Traffic levels in the U.K. are forecast to increase by up to 142% over the next two decades, leading to increased problems of congestion and environmental deterioration. We appear to be reaching a near consensus that the way to deal with these problems is with limited road building accompanied by some form of transport demand restraint measures. The success of such measures depends on the level of dependence of the public on their cars, their attitudes to congestion and the environment and their outlook on the concept and the practicality of the measures. This paper addresses these issues using the results of a questionnaire survey of 2428 households in the U.K. It concludes that although most people recognise the problems caused by traffic, they are unwilling to do much about it voluntarily. Demand restraint measures that hit people's purses directly appeared likely to meet with most success, but because of the level of attachment of many people to their cars, if real demand restraint is required, direct controls may be necessary.

Suggested Citation

  • Cullinane, Sharon, 1992. "Attitudes towards the car in the U.K.: Some implications for policies on congestion and the environment," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 291-301, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:26:y:1992:i:4:p:291-301
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0965-8564(92)90017-2
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Cao, Xinyu & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2005. "How do individuals adapt their personal travel? A conceptual exploration of the consideration of travel-related strategies," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 199-206, May.
    2. Salomon, Ilan & Mokhtarian, Patricia, 1998. "What Happens When Mobility-Inclined Market Segments Face Accessibility-Enhancing Policies?," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt2x75525j, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    3. Genevieve Giuliano, 2000. "Land Use Policy and Transportation: Why We Won't Get There from Here," Working Paper 8649, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    4. Cao, Xinyu & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2005. "How do individuals adapt their personal travel? Objective and subjective influences on the consideration of travel-related strategies for San Francisco Bay Area commuters," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 291-302, July.
    5. Bastani, Parisa & Heywood, John B. & Hope, Chris, 2012. "The effect of uncertainty on US transport-related GHG emissions and fuel consumption out to 2050," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 517-548.
    6. Cullinane, S., 2002. "The relationship between car ownership and public transport provision: a case study of Hong Kong," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 29-39, January.
    7. Eric N. AIDOO & William AGYEMANG & Jane E. MONKAH & Francis K. AFUKAAR, 2013. "pASSENGER’S SATISFACTION WITH PUBLIC BUS TRANSPORT SERVICES IN GHANA: A CASE STUDY OF KUMASI–ACCRA ROUTE," Theoretical and Empirical Researches in Urban Management, Research Centre in Public Administration and Public Services, Bucharest, Romania, vol. 8(2), pages 33-44, May.
    8. Guiver, J.W., 2007. "Modal talk: Discourse analysis of how people talk about bus and car travel," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 233-248, March.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:26:y:1992:i:4:p:291-301. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/547/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.