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Jobs/housing balance and employer-based travel demand management program returns to scale: Evidence from Los Angeles

Listed author(s):
  • Zhou, Jiangping
  • Wang, Yin
  • Schweitzer, Lisa
Registered author(s):

    Research on environmental justice and social inclusion suggests that high-income wage earners may have better job access due to their greater choices in both housing and transportation markets. This study compares the jobs/housing balance and mode choice of different groups of employees of a large employer (27,113 employees) and those of the “reference groups” from comparable employees working for smaller employers in Los Angeles. Based on spatial and statistical analyses, this paper finds the following:

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967070X11001314
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transport Policy.

    Volume (Year): 20 (2012)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 22-35

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:20:y:2012:i:c:p:22-35
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2011.11.003
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    1. P Gordon & H W Richardson & H L Wong, 1986. "The Distribution of Population and Employment in a Polycentric City: The Case of Los Angeles," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 18(2), pages 161-173, February.
    2. Evelyn Blumenberg & Paul Ong, 1998. "Job accessibility and welfare usage: Evidence from Los Angeles," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(4), pages 639-657.
    3. Giuliano, Genevieve, 1991. "Is Jobs-Housing Balance a Transportation Issue?," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4874r4hg, University of California Transportation Center.
    4. Mohring, Herbert, 1972. "Optimization and Scale Economies in Urban Bus Transportation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(4), pages 591-604, September.
    5. Small, Kenneth A & Song, Shunfeng, 1992. ""Wasteful" Commuting: A Resolution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 888-898, August.
    6. Giuliano, Genevieve & Small, Kenneth A., 1991. "Subcenters in the Los Angeles region," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 163-182, July.
    7. Frans M. Dieleman & Martin Dijst & Guillaume Burghouwt, 2002. "Urban Form and Travel Behaviour: Micro-level Household Attributes and Residential Context," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 39(3), pages 507-527, March.
    8. Martin Wachs & Brian D. Taylor & Ned Levine & Paul Ong, 1993. "The Changing Commute: A Case-study of the Jobs-Housing Relationship over Time," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 30(10), pages 1711-1729, December.
    9. P Gordon & H W Richardson & H L Wong, 1986. "The distribution of population and employment in a polycentric city: the case of Los Angeles," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 18(2), pages 161-173, February.
    10. Brown, Jeffrey & Hess, Daniel Baldwin & Shoup, Donald, 2003. "Fare-Free Public Transit at Universities: An Evaluation," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3rt6d1hz, University of California Transportation Center.
    11. David Merriman & Toru Ohkawara & Tsutomu Suzuki, 1995. "Excess Commuting in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area: Measurement and Policy Simulations," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 32(1), pages 69-85, February.
    12. Frost, Martin & Linneker, Brian & Spence, Nigel, 1998. "Excess or wasteful commuting in a selection of British cities," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 529-538, September.
    13. Giuliano, Genevieve, 1995. "The Weakening Transportation-Land Use Connection," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt1dn8t3w7, University of California Transportation Center.
    14. DeSalvo, Joseph S. & Huq, Mobinul, 1996. "Income, Residential Location, and Mode Choice," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 84-99, July.
    15. Shannon, Tya & Giles-Corti, Billie & Pikora, Terri & Bulsara, Max & Shilton, Trevor & Bull, Fiona, 2006. "Active commuting in a university setting: Assessing commuting habits and potential for modal change," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 240-253, May.
    16. Mark W. Horner & Alan T. Murray, 2002. "Excess Commuting and the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 39(1), pages 131-139, January.
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