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Public attitudes to TDM measures: a comparative study

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  • Thorpe, Neil
  • Hills, Peter
  • Jaensirisak, Sittha

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a range of data analyses of users' attitudinal responses to various travel-demand management measures in two case-study cities in the UK: Cambridge and Newcastle upon Tyne. The analyses focus on several important aspects of implementing TDM measures, including the relationship between the perceived effectiveness and public acceptance of alternative TDM measures and how the generated net benefits, in particular the revenues raised from road-user charging and increased parking charges, are used. A number of key issues are identified for the implementation of TDM measures that are both acceptable to the public and also capable of achieving their stated objectives.

Suggested Citation

  • Thorpe, Neil & Hills, Peter & Jaensirisak, Sittha, 2000. "Public attitudes to TDM measures: a comparative study," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 243-257, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:7:y:2000:i:4:p:243-257
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Small, Kenneth A., 1992. "Using the Revenues from Congestion Pricing," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt32p9m3mm, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Ison, Stephen, 1998. "A concept in the right place at the wrong time: congestion metering in the city of Cambridge," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 139-146, June.
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    Cited by:

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    3. Tørnblad, Silje H. & Kallbekken, Steffen & Korneliussen, Kristine & Mideksa, Torben K., 2014. "Using mobility management to reduce private car use: Results from a natural field experiment in Norway," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 9-15.
    4. Winslott-Hiselius, Lena & Brundell-Freij, Karin & Vagland, Asa & Byström, Camilla, 2009. "The development of public attitudes towards the Stockholm congestion trial," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 269-282, March.
    5. Link, Heike, 2007. "Chapter 6 The role of the case studies and the main policy questions addressed," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 135-142, January.
    6. Whitehead, Tim, 2002. "Road user charging and business performance: identifying the processes of economic change," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 221-240, July.
    7. Loureiro, Maria L. & Labandeira, Xavier & Hanemann, Michael, 2013. "Transport and low-carbon fuel: A study of public preferences in Spain," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(S1), pages 126-133.
    8. Eliasson, Jonas & Jonsson, Lina, 2011. "The unexpected "yes": Explanatory factors behind the positive attitudes to congestion charges in Stockholm," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 636-647, August.
    9. Aldridge, K. & Carreno, M. & Ison, S. & Rye, T. & Straker, I., 2006. "Car parking management at airports: A special case?," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 13(6), pages 511-521, November.
    10. repec:kap:transp:v:44:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11116-015-9672-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Khalilikhah, Majid & Habibian, Meeghat & Heaslip, Kevin, 2016. "Acceptability of increasing petrol price as a TDM pricing policy: A case study in Tehran," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 136-144.
    12. Attard, Maria, 2012. "Reforming the urban public transport bus system in Malta: Approach and acceptance," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(7), pages 981-992.
    13. Odeck, James & Bråthen, Svein, 2002. "Toll financing in Norway: The success, the failures and perspectives for the future," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 253-260, July.
    14. Kottenhoff, Karl & Brundell Freij, Karin, 2009. "The role of public transport for feasibility and acceptability of congestion charging - The case of Stockholm," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 297-305, March.
    15. Beirão, Gabriela & Sarsfield Cabral, J.A., 2007. "Understanding attitudes towards public transport and private car: A qualitative study," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(6), pages 478-489, November.
    16. Sundo, Marloe B. & Fujii, Satoshi, 2005. "The effects of a compressed working week on commuters' daily activity patterns," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 835-848, December.
    17. Habibian, Meeghat & Kermanshah, Mohammad, 2013. "Coping with congestion: Understanding the role of simultaneous transportation demand management policies on commuters," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 229-237.
    18. Cools, Mario & Brijs, Kris & Tormans, Hans & De Laender, Jessie & Wets, Geert, 2012. "Optimizing the implementation of policy measures through social acceptance segmentation," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 80-87.
    19. Eriksson, Louise & Garvill, Jörgen & Nordlund, Annika M., 2008. "Acceptability of single and combined transport policy measures: The importance of environmental and policy specific beliefs," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(8), pages 1117-1128, October.
    20. Vigar, Geoff & Shaw, Andrew & Swann, Richard, 2011. "Selling sustainable mobility: The reporting of the Manchester Transport Innovation Fund bid in UK media," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 468-479, March.
    21. Farrell, Séona & Saleh, Wafaa, 2005. "Road-user charging and the modelling of revenue allocation," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(5), pages 431-442, September.

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