IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cdl/uctcwp/qt4bh3b670.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Coping with Congestion: Understanding the Gap Between Policy Assumptions and Behavior

Author

Listed:
  • Salomon, Ilan
  • Mokhtarian, Patricia L.

Abstract

With congestion being a major social and environmental cost of urban and metropolitan transportation, it has become a major target for policy-makers and planners. However, policies to curb congestion have had little effect. It is suggested that there is a wide gap between the assumptions which underlie policy measures and the manner in which individual users perceive and, consequently, respond to policy measures. This gap can partially be explained by the fact that the set of alternative responses to growing congestion is wider and somewhat different from that assumed by policy-makers. Moreover, the distributional impacts of various responses are such that their benefits and costs, as perceived by the user, create barriers to adoption. The dynamics of the behavioral response are also often overlooked by policy-makers, resulting in the promulgation of measures which have little or not effect on users’ behavior. This paper reviews 16 possible behavioral responses from a coping strategy perspective, and emphasizes their distributional impacts. Finally, the paper analyzes some of the implications of the gap between policy-making and user response.

Suggested Citation

  • Salomon, Ilan & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 1997. "Coping with Congestion: Understanding the Gap Between Policy Assumptions and Behavior," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4bh3b670, University of California Transportation Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt4bh3b670
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/4bh3b670.pdf;origin=repeccitec
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Schwanen, Tim & Dieleman, Frans M. & Dijst, Martin, 2002. "The impact of metropolitan structure on commute behavior in the Netherlands: a multilevel approach," ERSA conference papers ersa02p069, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Cao, Xinyu & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2005. "How do individuals adapt their personal travel? A conceptual exploration of the consideration of travel-related strategies," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 199-206, May.
    3. Páez, Antonio & Whalen, Kate, 2010. "Enjoyment of commute: A comparison of different transportation modes," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(7), pages 537-549, August.
    4. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Raney, Elizabeth A. & Salomon, Ilan, 1997. "Behavioral response to congestion: identifying patterns and socio-economic differences in adoption," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 147-160, July.
    5. Sangho Choo & Patricia Mokhtarian, 2008. "How do people respond to congestion mitigation policies? A multivariate probit model of the individual consideration of three travel-related strategy bundles," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 145-163, March.
    6. Redmond, Lothlorien, 2000. "Identifying and Analyzing Travel-Related Attitudinal, Personality, and Lifestyle Clusters in the San Francisco Bay Area," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt0317h7v4, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    7. Schwanen, Tim & Dijst, Martin, 2002. "Travel-time ratios for visits to the workplace: the relationship between commuting time and work duration," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 573-592, August.
    8. Irene Casas & Mei-Po Kwan, 2007. "The Impact of Real-Time Information on Choices During the Commute Trip: Evidence from a Travel Simulator," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(4), pages 523-543.
    9. Edoardo Marcucci, 1999. "Road Pricing: Old Beliefs, Present Awareness and Future Research Patterns," Working Papers 1999.4, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    10. Catherine Morency, 2007. "The ambivalence of ridesharing," Transportation, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 239-253, March.
    11. Cao, Xinyu & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2005. "How do individuals adapt their personal travel? Objective and subjective influences on the consideration of travel-related strategies for San Francisco Bay Area commuters," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 291-302, July.
    12. Choo, Sangho & Mokhtarian, Patricia L, 2004. "Modeling the Individual Consideration of Travel-Related Strategy Bundles," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt3123v46c, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    13. Taylor, Brian & Osman, Taner & Thomas, Trevor & Mondschein, Andrew, 2016. "Not So Fast: A Study of Traffic Delays, Access, and Economic Activity in the San Francisco Bay Area," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt9qf2481r, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social and Behavioral Sciences;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt4bh3b670. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Lisa Schiff). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/itucbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.