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Attitudes, mode switching behavior, and the built environment: A longitudinal study in the Puget Sound Region

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  • Wang, Tingting
  • Chen, Cynthia

Abstract

Carpooling in the US has a storied history. After experiencing a peak 20% mode share in 1980, the current share of carpooling for work trips is about 10% and the majority of these carpooling trips are made by intra-household members. Casting the choice between SOV and carpool as a social dilemma in which SOV is a noncooperative choice and carpool is a cooperative one, we propose to test two hypotheses. First, the switch from SOV to carpool and the reverse choice are attributed to different factors—structural factors, or those factors altering the objective features of a decision scenario such as travel time and travel cost, play a dominant role in the switch from carpool to SOV while psychosocial factors (attitudes and beliefs) play a critical role in the switch from SOV to carpool. Second, the two choices are underlay by different behavioral mechanisms. In particular, we expect self-justification by carpool-to-SOV switchers—after they switch from carpool to SOV, they adjusted their attitudes toward carpool accordingly to match their behavior. The analysis of the first three waves of the Puget Sound Transportation Panel supports these two hypotheses. Our study results recommend developing programs and policies that aim at influencing people’s subjective assessments of carpooling, in addition to the existing ones that mostly focus on incentivizing carpooling, and differentiating between programs seeking to encourage SOV users to switch to carpool and those aiming to maintain existing carpoolers.

Suggested Citation

  • Wang, Tingting & Chen, Cynthia, 2012. "Attitudes, mode switching behavior, and the built environment: A longitudinal study in the Puget Sound Region," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1594-1607.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:46:y:2012:i:10:p:1594-1607
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2012.08.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Vij, Akshay & Walker, Joan L., 2016. "How, when and why integrated choice and latent variable models are latently useful," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 192-217.
    2. repec:eee:energy:v:148:y:2018:i:c:p:148-158 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Jinhyun Hong & Cynthia Chen, 2014. "The role of the built environment on perceived safety from crime and walking: examining direct and indirect impacts," Transportation, Springer, vol. 41(6), pages 1171-1185, November.
    4. Petschnig, Martin & Heidenreich, Sven & Spieth, Patrick, 2014. "Innovative alternatives take action – Investigating determinants of alternative fuel vehicle adoption," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 68-83.
    5. Kaplan, Sigal & de Abreu e Silva, João & Di Ciommo, Floridea, 2014. "The relationship between young people׳s transit use and their perceptions of equity concepts in transit service provision," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 79-87.
    6. repec:eee:trapol:v:65:y:2018:i:c:p:126-136 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Nielsen, Jesper Riber & Hovmøller, Harald & Blyth, Pascale-L. & Sovacool, Benjamin K., 2015. "Of “white crows” and “cash savers:” A qualitative study of travel behavior and perceptions of ridesharing in Denmark," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 113-123.
    8. Chenfeng Xiong & Lei Zhang, 2017. "Dynamic travel mode searching and switching analysis considering hidden model preference and behavioral decision processes," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 511-532, May.
    9. Spears, Steven & Houston, Douglas & Boarnet, Marlon G., 2013. "Illuminating the unseen in transit use: A framework for examining the effect of attitudes and perceptions on travel behavior," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 40-53.

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