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Worker Absenteeism and Sick Pay

Author

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  • Treble,John
  • Barmby,Tim

Abstract

Absenteeism is the single most important cause of lost labour time, yet it has received much less scholarly attention than more dramatic forms of industrial disruption, such as strikes. Arguing that any explanation of absence rates must take into account the interests of both employers and employees, this book constructs a model of the markets for absence and sick pay. These are not independent since sick pay affects workers' incentives to be absent, and absences affect employers' willingness to pay sick pay. The book reviews the available empirical evidence relating to both markets, stressing the importance of careful identification of the effect of the price of absence on demand, since this is a crucial quantity for firms' policies. It concludes by discussing the implications of the model for human resources management, and for the role of the state in sick pay provision.

Suggested Citation

  • Treble,John & Barmby,Tim, 2011. "Worker Absenteeism and Sick Pay," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521806954.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521806954
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Adrian Chadi & Laszlo Goerke, 2015. "Missing at Work – Sickness-related Absence and Subsequent Job Mobility," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201504, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    2. Lorenz, Olga & Goerke, Laszlo, 2015. "Commuting and Sickness Absence," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113173, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Karlsson, Tobias, 2016. "Gender differences in absence from work: Lessons from two world wars," Working Paper Series 2016:26, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    4. Rieck, Karsten Marshall Elseth & Vaage, Kjell, 2012. "Social Interactions At The Workplace: Exploring Sickness Absence Behavior," Working Papers in Economics 11/12, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    5. Böckerman, Petri & Kanninen, Ohto & Suoniemi, Ilpo, 2014. "A Kink that Makes You Sick: The Incentive Effect of Sick Pay on Absence," IZA Discussion Papers 8205, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Boris HirschBy & Daniel S. J. Lechmann & Claus Schnabel, 2017. "Coming to work while sick: an economic theory of presenteeism with an application to German data," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(4), pages 1010-1031.
    7. Gregori Baetschmann & Rainer Winkelmann, 2012. "Modelling zero-inflated count data when exposure varies: with an application to sick leave," ECON - Working Papers 061, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    8. Hassink, Wolter & Fernandez, Roberto M., 2015. "Worker Morale and Effort: Is the Relationship Causal?," IZA Discussion Papers 8909, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Heijnen, Suzanne & Hassink, Wolter & Plantenga, Janneke, 2016. "Sickness absenteeism during a period of job-to-job transition," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 145-147.
    10. Böckerman, Petri & Bryson, Alex & Ilmakunnas, Pekka, 2012. "Does high involvement management improve worker wellbeing?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 660-680.
    11. Böckerman, Petri & Kanninen, Ohto & Suoniemi, Ilpo, 2014. "A Kink that Makes You Sick: the Effect of Sick Pay on Absence in a Social Insurance System," MPRA Paper 61010, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Daniel S. J. Lechmann & Claus Schnabel, 2014. "Absence from Work of the Self-Employed: A Comparison with Paid Employees," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(3), pages 368-390, August.
    13. Bryson, Alex & Dale-Olsen, Harald, 2017. "Does Sick Pay Affect Workplace Absence?," IZA Discussion Papers 11222, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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