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Commuting and self-employment in Western Europe

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  • Giménez-Nadal, José Ignacio
  • Molina, José Alberto
  • Velilla, Jorge

Abstract

This paper explores the commuting behavior of workers in Western European countries, with a focus on the differences in commuting time between employees and the self-employed in these countries. Using data from the last wave of the European Working Conditions Survey (2015), we analyze the commuting behavior of workers, finding that male and female self-employed workers devote 14% and 20% less time to commuting than their employee counterparts, respectively. Furthermore, differences in commuting time between employees and self-employed females depend on the degree of urbanization of the worker’s residential location, as the difference in commuting time between the two groups of female workers is greater in rural areas, in comparison to workers living in urban areas. By analyzing differences in commuting time between groups of European workers, our analysis may serve to guide future planning programs.

Suggested Citation

  • Giménez-Nadal, José Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2020. "Commuting and self-employment in Western Europe," GLO Discussion Paper Series 514, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:514
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    Cited by:

    1. Bellido, Héctor, 2020. "Análisis internacional de las decisiones emprendedoras: aspectos económicos, emocionales, saludables y familiares [International analysis of entrepreneurial decisions: economic, emotional, healthy ," MPRA Paper 104487, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2020. "Elderly's Mobility to and from Work in the US: Metropolitan Status and Population Size," IZA Discussion Papers 13949, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Palacios, Saúl, 2021. "Desplazamientos y autoempleo en Francia: diferencias por género [Commuting y self-employment in France: gender differences]," MPRA Paper 106555, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Lozano, Javier, 2021. "Commuting y auto-empleo en Italia: diferencias por género y localización geográfica [Commuting and self employment in Italy: gender differences and geographical locations]," MPRA Paper 106279, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. J. Ignacio, Giménez-Nadal & Ignacio, De la Fuente, 2021. "Análisis socio-demográfico del tiempo disponible de los miembros del Ejército en España: ¿existen diferencias por género?, ¿es relevante la climatología?1 [Socio-demographic analysis of spanich arm," MPRA Paper 105318, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Gonzalez-Alvarez, María A., 2020. "Emprendimiento, rentas de las familias y políticas activas de empleo [Entrepreneurship, family income and active employment policies]," MPRA Paper 104218, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Hernández, Jaime, 2021. "Tiempo de desplazamiento al puesto laboral y relación con los empleados autónomos: el caso de las mujeres trabajadoras alemanas [Commuting time and relationship with self-employed: the case of Germ," MPRA Paper 106040, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Velilla, Jorge, 2020. "Intergenerational correlation of self-employment in European countries," MPRA Paper 104184, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Claver, Raúl, 2021. "Determinantes del tiempo de desplazamiento al trabajo en la población femenina auto-empleada de Dinamarca [Pattern of Commuting time of female self-worked population in Denmark]," MPRA Paper 106373, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & de la Fuente, Ignacio, 2021. "¿Son saludables y sostenibles los desplazamientos diarios de las personas? Evidencia empírica en Aragón y España [Are people's daily commutes healthy and sustainable? Empirical evidence in Aragon a," MPRA Paper 105454, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. J. Ignacio, Giménez-Nadal & Ignacio, De la Fuente, 2020. "Asalariados versus autoempleados: Diferencias en el uso del tiempo entre España y Aragón [Employed versus self-employed: Time use differences between Spain and Aragon]," MPRA Paper 105181, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Margalejo Hernández, Cristina, 2021. "Commuting y autoempleo en Luxemburgo [Commuting and self-employment in Luxemburgo]," MPRA Paper 106183, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Commuting time; European Working Conditions Survey; Self-employed workers; Employees;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • R40 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - General
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

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