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The relationship between well-being and commuting revisited: Does the choice of methodology matter?

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  • Dickerson, Andy
  • Hole, Arne Risa
  • Munford, Luke A.

Abstract

This paper provides an assessment of a range of alternative estimators for fixed-effects ordered models in the context of estimating the relationship between subjective well-being and commuting behaviour. In contrast to previous papers in the literature we find no evidence that longer commutes are associated with lower levels of subjective well-being, in general. From a methodological point of view our results support earlier findings that linear and ordered fixed-effects models of life satisfaction give similar results. However, we argue that ordered models are more appropriate as they are theoretically preferable, straightforward to implement and lead to easily interpretable results.

Suggested Citation

  • Dickerson, Andy & Hole, Arne Risa & Munford, Luke A., 2014. "The relationship between well-being and commuting revisited: Does the choice of methodology matter?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 321-329.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:49:y:2014:i:c:p:321-329
    DOI: 10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2014.09.004
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Well-being; Commuting; Fixed-effects;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise

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