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The Relationship Between Well-Being and Commuting Re-Visited: Does the Choice of Methodology Matter?

  • Andy Dickerson

    ()

    (Department of Economics, The University of Sheffield)

  • Arne Risa Hole

    ()

    (Department of Economics, The University of Sheffield)

  • Luke Munford

    ()

    (Department of Economics, The University of Sheffield)

This paper provides an assessment of a range of alternative estimators for fixed-effects ordered models in the context of estimating the relationship between sub- jective well-being and commuting behaviour. In contrast to previous papers in the literature we find no evidence that longer commutes are associated with lower lev- els of subjective well-being, in general. From a methodological point of view our results support earlier findings that linear and ordered fixed-effects models of life satisfaction give similar results. However, we argue that ordered models are more appropriate as they are theoretically preferable, straightforward to implement and lead to easily interpretable results.

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File URL: http://www.shef.ac.uk/economics/research/serps/articles/2012_016.html
File Function: First version, 2012
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Paper provided by The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2012016.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:shf:wpaper:2012016
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