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The Relationship Between Well-Being and Commuting Re-Visited: Does the Choice of Methodology Matter?


  • Andy Dickerson

    () (Department of Economics, The University of Sheffield)

  • Arne Risa Hole

    () (Department of Economics, The University of Sheffield)

  • Luke Munford

    () (Department of Economics, The University of Sheffield)


This paper provides an assessment of a range of alternative estimators for fixed-effects ordered models in the context of estimating the relationship between sub- jective well-being and commuting behaviour. In contrast to previous papers in the literature we find no evidence that longer commutes are associated with lower lev- els of subjective well-being, in general. From a methodological point of view our results support earlier findings that linear and ordered fixed-effects models of life satisfaction give similar results. However, we argue that ordered models are more appropriate as they are theoretically preferable, straightforward to implement and lead to easily interpretable results.

Suggested Citation

  • Andy Dickerson & Arne Risa Hole & Luke Munford, 2012. "The Relationship Between Well-Being and Commuting Re-Visited: Does the Choice of Methodology Matter?," Working Papers 2012016, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:shf:wpaper:2012016

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Nie, Peng & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2015. "Commute time and subjective well-being in urban China," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 09-2015, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    2. Possenriede, Daniel & Plantenga, Janneke, 2014. "Temporal and Locational Flexibility of Work, Working-Time Fit, and Job Satisfaction," IZA Discussion Papers 8436, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Künn-Nelen, Annemarie, 2015. "Does Commuting Affect Health?," IZA Discussion Papers 9031, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Bishop, James, 2015. "No Rest for the Weary: Commuting, Hours Worked, and Sleep," MPRA Paper 62162, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Brown, Sarah & Gray, Daniel, 2016. "Household finances and well-being in Australia: An empirical analysis of comparison effects," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 17-36.
    6. Fiorillo, Damiano & Lubrano Lavadera, Giuseppe & Nappo, Nunzia, 2016. "Social participation and self-rated psychological health," MPRA Paper 72879, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Jones, Benjamin A., 2017. "Invasive Species Impacts on Human Well-being Using the Life Satisfaction Index," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 250-257.
    8. Arne Risa Hole & Anita Ratcliffe, 2015. "The impact of the London bombings on the wellbeing of young Muslims," Working Papers 2015002, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    9. Yilmazer, Tansel & Babiarz, Patryk & Liu, Fen, 2015. "The impact of diminished housing wealth on health in the United States: Evidence from the Great Recession," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 234-241.
    10. Olga Lorenz, 2017. "Does Commuting Matter to Subjective Well-Being?," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201707, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).

    More about this item


    well-being; commuting; fixed-effects;

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise

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