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Commuting Time and Household Responsibilities: Evidence Using Propensity Score Matching

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  • Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio

    () (University of Zaragoza)

  • Molina, José Alberto

    () (University of Zaragoza)

Abstract

The growth in women's participation in the labor force has attracted attention to the gender differences in commuting behavior, and to their implications. This study analyses the relationship between individual commuting behavior and household responsibilities, with a focus on gender differences in that relationship. Using the Dutch Time Use Surveys for the years 2000 and 2005, we analyze the relationship between commuting time, and the time devoted to home production and childcare. To deal with reverse causality, we use Propenstity Score Matching techniques to obtain imputed data for individuals. After reverse causality is taken into account, we find that the effect of home production on commuting time for women is more than double the effect for men, while childcare time has an effect on women's commuting time behavior only. Our results explain why prior studies have found that women have shorter commutes than men, shedding light on the Household Responsibility Hypothesis (HRH).

Suggested Citation

  • Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto, 2015. "Commuting Time and Household Responsibilities: Evidence Using Propensity Score Matching," IZA Discussion Papers 8794, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8794
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:regeco:v:69:y:2018:i:c:p:25-37 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Francesca Carta & Marta De Philippis, 2015. "You've come a long way, baby. Effects of commuting times on couples' labour supply," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1003, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. García, Lucia, 2018. "El mercado laboral en España desde la oferta: evolución reciente nacional y regional
      [Supply labour market in Spain: recent evolution at a national and regional level]
      ," MPRA Paper 85262, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. repec:eee:jotrge:v:66:y:2018:i:c:p:19-29 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Molina, José Alberto & Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Velilla, Jorge, 2018. "Intertemporal Labor Supply: A Household Collective Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 11276, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Gimenez-Nadal, Jose Ignacio & Molina, Jose Alberto, 2017. "The Substitution Effect and the Profit Function in Consumption: expressions from the Marshallian, Hicksian, and Frischian demand functions," MPRA Paper 82249, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Ferrando-Latorre, Sandra, 2017. "Risky consumption and intergenerational mobility: a research program in a family context," MPRA Paper 79777, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. repec:eee:econom:v:199:y:2017:i:2:p:141-155 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Campaña, Juan Carlos, 2017. "¿Pueden llegar a ser adictivos los comportamientos juveniles sedentarios en el hogar? Un programa de investigación con respuestas conceptuales y evidencia empírica
      [Can sedentary youth behaviors be
      ," MPRA Paper 81401, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2018. "Telework, the Timing of Work, and Instantaneous Well-Being: Evidence from Time Use Data," IZA Discussion Papers 11271, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2018. "Commuting Time and Sick-Day Absence of US Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 11700, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Yusuf Sofiyandi1, 2018. "The Effect of Residential Location and Housing Unit Characteristics on Labor Force Participation of Childbearing Women in Indonesia: Using Twin Births As A Quasi-Natural Experiment," LPEM FEBUI Working Papers 201822, LPEM, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Indonesia, revised Jul 2018.
    13. García, Lucia & Molina, José Alberto, 2017. "The household structure: recent international evolution," MPRA Paper 82049, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. McDonough, Ian K. & Millimet, Daniel L., 2017. "Missing data, imputation, and endogeneity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 199(2), pages 141-155.
    15. repec:eee:regeco:v:69:y:2018:i:c:p:122-129 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. J. Ignacio, Giménez-Nadal & Jose Alberto, Molina & Jorge, Velilla, 2017. "Leisure and effort at work: incorporating self-employment into urban markets," MPRA Paper 77972, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. García, Lucia, 2018. "Inter-generational and intra-generational transfers: international evidence," MPRA Paper 83986, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Gray Kimbrough, 2016. "What Drives Gender Differences in Commuting? Evidence from the American Time Use Survey," 2016 Papers pki275, Job Market Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    propensity score matching; childcare; home production; commuting; Multinational Time Use Study;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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