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Commuting distances in a household location choice model with amenities

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  • Ng, Chen Feng

Abstract

Observed commuting distances generally exceed those predicted by standard models of household location choice. This paper develops a model with locational amenities and two job centers. It is shown that differences in household preferences for amenities can lead to various types of residential location patterns, some of which result in higher average commuting distances in the city.

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  • Ng, Chen Feng, 2008. "Commuting distances in a household location choice model with amenities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 116-129, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:63:y:2008:i:1:p:116-129
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Brueckner, Jan K. & Thisse, Jacques-Francois & Zenou, Yves, 1999. "Why is central Paris rich and downtown Detroit poor?: An amenity-based theory," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 91-107, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tscharaktschiew, Stefan & Hirte, Georg, 2012. "Should subsidies to urban passenger transport be increased? A spatial CGE analysis for a German metropolitan area," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 285-309.
    2. J. Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal & José Alberto Molina, 2016. "Commuting Time And Household Responsibilities: Evidence Using Propensity Score Matching," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(2), pages 332-359, March.
    3. Tscharaktschiew, Stefan & Hirte, Georg, 2010. "How does the household structure shape the urban economy?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 498-516, November.
    4. Reichelt, Malte & Haas, Anette, 2015. "Commuting farther and earning more? : how employment density moderates workers commuting distance," IAB Discussion Paper 201533, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    5. Anette Haas & Malte Reichelt, 2015. "Larger pay, longer drives? Location specific wage effects on commuting distances," ERSA conference papers ersa15p1139, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Vincenzo Del Giudice & Pierfrancesco De Paola & Benedetto Manganelli & Fabiana Forte, 2017. "The Monetary Valuation of Environmental Externalities through the Analysis of Real Estate Prices," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-16, February.
    7. Brian Lee & Paul Waddell, 2010. "Residential mobility and location choice: a nested logit model with sampling of alternatives," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 587-601, July.
    8. Wrede, Matthias, 2015. "A continuous spatial choice logit model of a polycentric city," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 68-73.
    9. Nitzsche, Eric & Tscharaktschiew, Stefan, 2013. "Efficiency of speed limits in cities: A spatial computable general equilibrium assessment," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 23-48.
    10. Rafa Madariaga & Joan Martori & Ramon Oller, 2014. "Income, distance and amenities. An empirical analysis," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 1129-1146, November.
    11. Vincent Viguié, 2015. "Cross-commuting and housing prices in a polycentric modeling of cities," Policy Papers 2015.03, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
    12. repec:eee:transb:v:101:y:2017:i:c:p:283-294 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Matthias Wrede, 2014. "Continuous Logit Polycentric City Model," CESifo Working Paper Series 4580, CESifo Group Munich.

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