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Working-Time Mismatch and Mental Health

Author

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  • Steffen Otterbach
  • Mark Wooden
  • Yin King Fok

Abstract

Nationally representative panel survey data for Germany and Australia are used to investigate the impact of working-time mismatches (i.e., differences between actual and desired work hours) on mental health, as measured by the Mental Component Summary Score from the SF-12. Fixed effects and dynamic linear models are estimated, which, together with the longitudinal nature of the data, enable person-specific traits that are time invariant to be controlled for. The incorporation of dynamics also reduces concerns about the potential effects of reverse causation. The results suggest that overemployment (working more hours than desired) has adverse consequences for the mental health of workers in both countries. Underemployment (working fewer hours than desired), however, seems to only be of significance in Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Steffen Otterbach & Mark Wooden & Yin King Fok, 2016. "Working-Time Mismatch and Mental Health," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 843, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp843
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Bell & Steffen Otterbach & Alfonso Sousa-Poza, 2012. "Work Hours Constraints and Health," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 105-106, pages 35-54.
    2. Hielke Buddelmeyer & Duncan McVicar & Mark Wooden, 2015. "Non-Standard “Contingent” Employment and Job Satisfaction: A Panel Data Analysis," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2), pages 256-275, April.
    3. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren & Robert Drago, 2009. "Working Time Mismatch and Subjective Well-being," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(1), pages 147-179, March.
    4. Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2005. "Simple solutions to the initial conditions problem in dynamic, nonlinear panel data models with unobserved heterogeneity," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 39-54.
    5. Matthias Nübling & Hanfried H. Andersen & Axel Mühlbacher & Jürgen Schupp & Gert G. Wagner, 2007. "Computation of Standard Values for Physical and Mental Health Scale Scores Using the SOEP Version of SF12v2," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 127(1), pages 171-182.
    6. Silvana Robone & Andrew Jones & Nigel Rice, 2011. "Contractual conditions, working conditions and their impact on health and well-being," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 12(5), pages 429-444, October.
    7. Colin Green & Parvinder Kler & Gareth Leeves, 2010. "Flexible Contract Workers in Inferior Jobs: Reappraising the Evidence," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(3), pages 605-629, September.
    8. Wunder, Christoph & Heineck, Guido, 2013. "Working time preferences, hours mismatch and well-being of couples: Are there spillovers?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 244-252.
    9. Cernat, Alexandru & Couper, Mick P. & Ofstedal, Mary Beth, 2015. "Estimation of mode effects in the Health and Retirement Study using measurement models," ISER Working Paper Series 2015-19, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    10. Nicole Watson & Mark Wooden, 2014. "Re-engaging with survey non-respondents: evidence from three household panels," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 177(2), pages 499-522, February.
    11. Francis Green & Nicholas Tsitsianis, 2005. "An Investigation of National Trends in Job Satisfaction in Britain and Germany," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 43(3), pages 401-429, September.
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    1. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:26:y:2017:i:c:p:96-111 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Australia; Germany; mental health; Mental Component Summary Score (SF-12); longitudinal data; work hours; working-time mismatch;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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