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Underemployment in the Turkish Labor Market

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  • Zehra Bilgen SUSANLI

Abstract

Using individual-level data from Household Labor Force Surveys for the period 2009-2015, this paper examines the determinants of underemployment in the sample of wage and salary earners in Turkey. Findings from Probit estimations indicate that the effect of gender on the likelihood of underemployment is not statistically significant, and there is a negative association between educational attainment and the likelihood of underemployment. Within the group of higher educated individuals, there are important differences across fields of study.

Suggested Citation

  • Zehra Bilgen SUSANLI, 2017. "Underemployment in the Turkish Labor Market," Sosyoekonomi Journal, Sosyoekonomi Society, issue 25(33).
  • Handle: RePEc:sos:sosjrn:170308
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren & Robert Drago, 2009. "Working Time Mismatch and Subjective Well‐being," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(1), pages 147-179, March.
    2. Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Francesco Pastore, 2012. "Overeducation at a glance. Determinants and wage effects of the educational mismatch, looking at the AlmaLaurea data," Discussion Papers 18_2012, CRISEI, University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
    3. Wunder, Christoph & Heineck, Guido, 2013. "Working time preferences, hours mismatch and well-being of couples: Are there spillovers?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 244-252.
    4. Francis Green & Yu Zhu, 2010. "Overqualification, job dissatisfaction, and increasing dispersion in the returns to graduate education," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 62(4), pages 740-763, October.
    5. Irene Mosca & Robert Wright, 2011. "Is Graduate Under-employment Persistent? Evidence from the United Kingdom," Working Papers 1134, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    6. Francis Green & Steven McIntosh, 2007. "Is there a genuine under-utilization of skills amongst the over-qualified?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(4), pages 427-439.
    7. Francis Green & Golo Henseke, 2016. "Should governments of OECD countries worry about graduate underemployment?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(4), pages 514-537.
    8. Michael Spence, 1973. "Job Market Signaling," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 87(3), pages 355-374.
    9. Yamada, Gustavo & Lavado, Pablo & Martínez, Joan J., 2015. "An Unfulfilled Promise? Higher Education Quality and Professional Underemployment in Peru," IZA Discussion Papers 9591, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Underemployment; Turkey; Graduates;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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