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Fertility Intentions Of University Graduates

Listed author(s):
  • Isabella Buber-Ennser
  • Ralina Panova
  • Jürgen Dorbritz
Registered author(s):

    Increasing numbers of young people enter university-level programmes and the share of university graduates among today’s young adults is expected to be around 40 per cent in OECD countries. Education-specific studies reveal differences in fertility behaviour. Childlessness is a particularly widespread phenomenon among female university graduates in Western Germany and Austria, and highly educated women are less likely to hhave larger families with three or more children. Based on the Generations and Gender Survey (GSS), we study fertility intentions of university graduates. We concentrate on university degree holders aged 27 to 40 years in Western Germany and Austria, and compare them with their peers in France and Norway. We aim to find out how different life domains are associate with the intention to have a child within the next three years. We identify determinants of fertility intentions based on the concept of the life course and inspired by the concept of the rush hour of life. We examine associations between employment and relationship on the one hand, and plans to start a family on the other. We analyse the extent to which the current individual situation in the life domains of work and partnership and their durations are related to short-term fertility intentions, taking into consideration possible gender-specific and country-specific differences. The study reveals that in Western Germany and Austria childless highly educated women are less likely to intend to have a child within the next three years. Moreover, gender differences are notable in these two countries, with women less often intending to have a child in the near future than men.

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    File URL: http://demografia.hu/en/publicationsonline/index.php/demografiaenglishedition/article/download/842/631/842-634-1-PB.pdf
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    Article provided by Hungarian Demographic Research Institute in its journal Demográfia English Edition.

    Volume (Year): 56 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 5 ()
    Pages: 5-34

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    Handle: RePEc:nki:journl:v:56:y:2013:i:5:p:5-34
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    1. Alexia Fürnkranz-Prskawetz & Tomáš Sobotka & Isabella Buber-Ennser & Henriette Engelhardt & Richard Gisser, 2008. "Austria: Persistent low fertility since the mid-1980s," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(12), pages 293-360, July.
    2. Robert Drago & Katina Sawyer & Karina M Shreffler & Diana Warren & Mark Wooden, 2009. "Did Australia's Baby Bonus Increase the Fertility Rate?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2009n01, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    3. Maria Iacovou & Lara Patrício Tavares, 2011. "Yearning, Learning, and Conceding: Reasons Men and Women Change Their Childbearing Intentions," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 37(1), pages 89-123, March.
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    5. Melinda Mills & Katia Begall & Letizia Mencarini & Maria Letizia Tanturri, 2008. "Gender equity and fertility intentions in Italy and the Netherlands," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 18(1), pages 1-26, February.
    6. Ronald Rindfuss, 1991. "The Young Adult Years: Diversity, Structural Change, and Fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 28(4), pages 493-512, November.
    7. Maria Rita Testa, 2012. "Couple disagreement about short-term fertility desires in Austria: Effects on intentions and contraceptive behaviour," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(3), pages 63-98, February.
    8. Laurent Toulemon & Ariane Pailhé & Clémentine Rossier, 2008. "France: High and stable fertility," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(16), pages 503-556, July.
    9. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Jungmin Lee, 2007. "Stressed Out on Four Continents: Time Crunch or Yuppie Kvetch?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(2), pages 374-383, May.
    10. Vegard Skirbekk, 2008. "Fertility trends by social status," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 18(5), pages 145-180, March.
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    14. repec:cai:poeine:pope_1003_0415 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Michaela Kreyenfeld & Kryštof Zeman & Marion Burkimsher & Ina Jaschinski, 2011. "Fertility data for German speaking countries. What is the potential? Where are the pitfalls?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2011-003, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    16. Rodolfo Bulatao, 1981. "Values and disvalues of children in successive childbearing decisions," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 18(1), pages 1-25, February.
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    18. repec:cai:poeine:pope_1102_0361 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Anne Salles & Clémentine Rossier & Sara Brachet, 2010. "Understanding the long term effects of family policies on fertility: The diffusion of different family models in France and Germany," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(34), pages 1057-1096, June.
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