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Valuing Australia's protected areas: A life satisfaction approach


  • Christopher L Ambrey
  • Christopher M Fleming


This paper uses the life satisfaction approach to value Australia's protected areas, grouped by International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) categories. We find significant positive life satisfaction effects of living in close proximity to protected areas in three of the seven categories. These life satisfaction effects correspond to implicit willingness-to-pays, in terms of annual household income, ranging from AUD$2950 to AUD$9650 for a 1% increase in the extent of that category of protected area within an individual's local area. This study therefore provides insights for policy makers in estimating the benefits of non-market goods provision.
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  • Christopher L Ambrey & Christopher M Fleming, 2012. "Valuing Australia's protected areas: A life satisfaction approach," Discussion Papers in Economics economics:201203, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:gri:epaper:economics:201203

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    1. repec:spr:endesu:v:19:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10668-016-9771-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Krekel, Christian & Kolbe, Jens & W├╝stemann, Henry, 2016. "The greener, the happier? The effect of urban land use on residential well-being," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 117-127.
    3. Bertram, Christine & Rehdanz, Katrin, 2015. "The role of urban green space for human well-being," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 139-152.
    4. Ambrey, Christopher L. & Chan, Andrew Yiu-Chung & Fleming, Christopher M., 2013. "Estimating the cost of air pollution in South East Queensland: An application of the life satisfaction non-market valuation approach," 2013 Conference (57th), February 5-8, 2013, Sydney, Australia 152133, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.

    More about this item


    Protected areas; non-market valuation; life satisfaction; happiness; Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA);

    JEL classification:

    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • R20 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - General

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