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Geography, Geology, and Regional Economic Development

Author

Listed:
  • Kevin Berry

    (University of Alaska Anchorage)

  • Alexander James

    (University of Alaska Anchorage)

  • Brock Smith

    (Montana State University)

  • Brett Watson

    (University of Alaska Anchorage)

Abstract

We examine long-run development effects of regional productivity shocks in the United States. We exploit the timing and location of large resource discoveries to measure exogenous variation in labor demand and consider heterogeneous effects based on environmental amenity and geographic isolation, developing novel measures of both. Using a dynamic event-study analysis we find that productivity shocks increase population both in the short and long-run, but this largely refl ects the experience of low amenity, geographically isolated places that may otherwise struggle to develop. Moreover, this study offers several insights into the observed spatial pattern of development in the United States.

Suggested Citation

  • Kevin Berry & Alexander James & Brock Smith & Brett Watson, 2019. "Geography, Geology, and Regional Economic Development," Working Papers 2019-03, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ala:wpaper:2019-03
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    File URL: http://www.econpapers.uaa.alaska.edu/RePEC/ala/wpaper/ALA201903.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Natural-Resource Discoveries; Regional Development; Long-Run Growth; Geography; Environmental Amenities; Resource Economics;

    JEL classification:

    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development
    • Q33 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Resource Booms (Dutch Disease)
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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