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Resetting the Urban Network: 117-2012

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  • Michaels, Guy
  • Rauch, Ferdinand

Abstract

Do locational fundamentals such as coastlines and rivers determine town locations, or can historical events trap towns in unfavorable locations for centuries? We examine the effects on town locations of the collapse of the Western Roman Empire, which temporarily ended urbanization in Britain, but not in France. As urbanization recovered, medieval towns were more often found in Roman-era town locations in France than in Britain, and this difference still persists today. The resetting of Britain's urban network gave it better access to naturally navigable waterways when this was important, while many French towns remained without such access.

Suggested Citation

  • Michaels, Guy & Rauch, Ferdinand, 2013. "Resetting the Urban Network: 117-2012," CEPR Discussion Papers 9760, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:9760
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    Cited by:

    1. Lopez-Uribe, Maria del Pilar & Castells-Quintana, David & McDermott, Thomas K. J., 2017. "Geography, institutions and development: a review ofthe long-run impacts of climate change," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 65147, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Tomoya Mori, 2017. "Agglomeration," KIER Working Papers 960, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    3. repec:anr:reveco:v:9:y:2017:p:21-58 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Adriana Kocornik-Mina & Thomas K.J. McDermott & Guy Michaels & Ferdinand Rauch, 2015. "Flooded cities," GRI Working Papers 221, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    5. Wahl, Fabian, 2015. "The long shadow of history: Roman legacy and economic development - evidence from the German limes," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 08-2015, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    6. Lin, Jeffrey, 2015. "The puzzling persistence of place," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q2, pages 1-8.
    7. Marc J. Melitz & Stephen J. Redding, 2014. "Missing Gains from Trade?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(5), pages 317-321, May.
    8. Novy, Dennis & Taylor, Alan, 2014. "Trade and Uncertainty," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100381, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    9. Bradford, W. David & Dolan, Paul & Galizzi, Matteo M., 2014. "Looking ahead: subjective time perception and individual discounting," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60265, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. Ferdinand Rauch & Christopher Parsons, 2016. "Migration and urbanisation in Post-Apartheid South Africa," Economics Series Working Papers 800, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    11. Philipp Ager & Casper Worm Hansen & Lars Lønstrup, 2015. "Shaking up the Equilibrium: Natural Disasters, Immigration and Economic Geography," Discussion Papers 15-17, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    12. Diego Puga, 2017. "The changing distribution of firms and workers across cities," Development Working Papers 418, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 21 Feb 2017.
    13. Andrew T. Young, 2016. "What does it take for a roving bandit settle down? Theory and an illustrative history of the Visigoths," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 168(1), pages 75-102, July.
    14. Stephen J. Redding & Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, 2017. "Quantitative Spatial Economics," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 9(1), pages 21-58, September.
    15. Remi Jedwab & Alexander Moradi, 2016. "The Permanent Effects of Transportation Revolutions in Poor Countries: Evidence from Africa," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(2), pages 268-284, May.
    16. Ferdinand Rauch, 2014. "A Fable of Bees and Gravity," Economics Series Working Papers 716, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    17. David Castells-Quintana & Maria del Pilar Lopez-Uribe & Tom McDermott, 2015. "Climate change and the geographical and institutional drivers of economic development," GRI Working Papers 198, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    18. McDermott,Thomas K.J., 2016. "Investing in disaster risk management in an uncertain climate," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7631, The World Bank.
    19. Thomas McGregor & Samuel Wills, 2017. "Surfing a wave of economic growth," CAMA Working Papers 2017-31, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    20. Stephan Heblich & Alex Trew, 2015. "Banking and Industrialization," CDMA Working Paper Series 201502, Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis, revised 01 Dec 2017.
    21. Buonanno, Paolo & Vanin, Paolo, 2017. "Social closure, surnames and crime," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 160-175.
    22. Huning, Thilo R. & Wolf, Nikolaus, 2016. "How England Unified Germany: Geography and the Rise of Prussia After 1815," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145725, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    23. Charles Angelucci & Simone Meraglia & Nico Voigtländer, 2017. "The Medieval Roots of Inclusive Institutions: From the Norman Conquest of England to the Great Reform Act," NBER Working Papers 23606, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Gojko Barjamovic & Thomas Chaney & Kerem A. Coşar & Ali Hortaçsu, 2017. "Trade, Merchants, and the Lost Cities of the Bronze Age," NBER Working Papers 23992, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    25. W. David Bradford & Paul Dolan & Matteo M. Galizzi, 2014. "Looking Ahead: Subjective Time Perception and Individual Time Discounting," CEP Discussion Papers dp1255, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic Geography; Economic History; Path Dependence; Transportation;

    JEL classification:

    • N93 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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